CSE 2014 Annual Meeting

Sunday, 4 May, 2014

Keynote Address

Dr. Siva Vaidhyananthan

Big Data and Publishing – The Legal, Ethical and Intellectual Implications for Editors

Dr. Vaidhyananthan is well known for his pioneering commentary on copyright, technology, and the dissemination information via the internet and in scholarly publication. His remarks will consider editors influence in selecting, presenting and sharing information. These hefty editorial responsibilities are further complicated by publishers requirement for a sustainable and profitable business model. Consequently, what is the right path?

01 – Misconduct Investigations – Collaboration and Confidentiality Collide

Speakers:

  • Charon Pierson, PhD, GNP-BC, FAAN, FAANP, Editor-in-Chief, Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, Wiley-Blackwell Publishers
  • Roy Kaufman, Managing Director of New Ventures, Copyright Clearence Center
  • Steven L. Shafer, Editor-in-Chief, Anesthesia & Analgesia, Stanford University

Recent cases of publication misconduct by authors have involved multiple journals and institutions that have crossed international boundaries. The Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) has posted a discussion paper to begin a dialogue about the ethical and legal implications of collaboration among editors who become involved in these large multinational and multijournal cases. Questions have surfaced about the legal and ethical implications of breeching confidentiality when the case involves submitted versus published papers, contacting institutional review boards, and publishing retractions across multiple journals. This session will continue that dialogue with a panel of COPE members, editors, and a lawyer and will include significant time for audience discussion.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe a systematic approach for investigating cases of author misconduct across multiple journals.
  • Describe the rationale for collaboration among editors in a situation of suspected misconduct of an author who appears to have submitted several papers to multiple journals.
  • Describe legal risks to journal editors and publishers in cases of author misconduct that might occur in various stages of an ethics investigation.
  • Develop a plan for mitigating risks to journals and publishers in evaluating potential cases of misconduct.

Moderator:

Jennifer Mahar

02 – Public Access and Reproducible Research: The Journal’s Role, Responsibility

Speakers:

  • David Crotty, PhD, Senior Editor, Board of Directors, Oxford University Prress, CHOR, Inc.
  • Trish Groves, MBBS, MRCPsych, Deputy Editor, Editor-in-Chief, BMJ, BMJ Open
  • William (Bill) Silberg, Director of Communications, Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)
  • Laurie Goodman, PhD, Editor-in-Chief, Giga Science

The scientific literature disseminates empirical and theoretical findings, facilitates debate about the validity, relevance and application of novel discoveries or established practices, and preserves a vital repository of working knowledge. Within this milieu is growing tension between a journals sustainable business model, the scientific imperative for accessibility (e.g., data or article contents) and federal funding requirements. On February 22, 2013, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) released guidelines for Expanding Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research. Authors must now permit free access to their articles resulting from federally funded research after 12 months of publication. Authors also must provide free access to the related research data. The International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICJME) has not commented on reproducible research and few journals have policies because they are not capable of supporting the infrastructure for reproducible research. There are several initiatives underway that can assist authors compliance with this federal requirement without journals assuming the burden of creating or maintaining new infrastructure. This session will explore the implications of the OSTP Public Access Policy and highlight novel mechanisms that can facilitate compliance with minimal burden to authors and journals.

Learning Objectives:

  • To understand the rationale and requirements of the federally mandated Public Access policy.
  • To describe approaches that can facilitate compliance with the policy (e.g., CHORUS).
  • To learn how funders are dealing with the policy (e.g., Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute [PCORI]).
  • To describe policy landscape of data sharing among medical journals (from a case-study perspective).

Moderator:

Christine Casey

03 – Authorship, Micro-attribution, and Social Engagement

Speakers:

  • Euan Adie, Founder, Altmetric
  • Laurel Haak, PhD, Executive Director,ORCID
  • Kira Anthony, PhD, Editorial Development Manager, Nature Publishing Group

Attribution of credit for research and scholarly contributions is an issue front and center for the entire scholarly community. What constitutes a contribution and how should it be documented? Can we manage disclosure more effectively? Nature Publishing Group has been investigating these issues from an editorial perspective, while organizations like ORCID and Altmetric are leaders in working with the community to define practical options. This panel will discuss the issues, and describe current efforts to build frameworks for managing credit and measuring impact.

Learning Objectives:

Moderator:

Donald Samulack

04 – Evolution of Article-Based (or Continuous) Publication: Workflow Options

Speakers:

  • Michael Friedman, PhD, Journals Production Manager, American Meteorological Society
  • Shaun Halloran, Senior Manager, Production, American Society of Civil Engineers
  • Suzanne Kettley, NRC Research Press
  • Lesli Mitchell, Managing Editor, Preventing Chronic Disease Journal, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

This session examines approaches to, and implementations of, article-based workflows for continuous publication of journal articles. Publishers have plenty of options when it comes to designing workflows to accomplish this, and the speakers will explore this topic from the points of view of a publisher actively publishing in such a way already, in the middle of implementing such a workflow, and one just starting down that path. What options should be considered and what have been the lessons learned? Attendees can expect to come away with a broad appreciation for the issues involved in a tricky journal production challenge.

Learning Objectives:

Moderator:

Michael Friedman

05 – Improving the Use of Reporting Guidelines at Your Journal

Speakers:

  • Cynthia Mulrow, MD, MSc, Senior Deputy Editor, Annals of Internal Medicine
  • Jason Roberts, Senior Partner, Origin Editorial

We will provide an overview of reporting guidelines (e.g. CONSORT for trials), why they are becoming increasingly vital for journals and how your journal might implement them into routine procedures in an effort to improve content quality. There is emerging evidence that reporting guidelines raise reporting standards, allow for the better validation of results during peer review and enable readers to more readily replicate the studies described. Whether you only occasionally receive a Randomized Controlled Trial or mandate authors adhere to one of the many reporting guidelines available, do you have a mechanism to check the reporting guideline checklists that your information for authors says is required? Get tips for how to introduce their use at your journal.

Learning Objectives:

  • To learn about reporting guidelines (e.g. CONSORT) and checklists.
  • To learn different ways that journals might facilitate use of reporting guidelines.
  • To learn ways to implement use of guidelines into a journal’s work flow.

Moderator:

Mary Beth Schaeffer

06 – Predatory Publishers: How to Recognize Publishing Fraud

Speakers:

  • Bruce Dancik, PhD, Editor-in-Chief, Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)
  • Donald Samulack, PhD, Director, Cactus Communications, Inc.
  • Jeffrey Beall, MA, MSLS, Associate Professor, Scholarly Initiatives Librarian, Auraria Library, University of Colorado, Denver

Librarian and researcher Jeffrey Beall created Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers and conceived the term “predatory open access.” This session will discuss who the predatory publishers are, how they operate, and why researchers should be wary of them. Also, the talk will explain why predatory publishing is so attractive to Asian authors. Emphasis will be placed on predatory publishing in the context of peer-review, and how this important function is not being handled properly by many open-access publishers.

Learning Objectives:

  • Who predatory publishers are, what they do, and why we should be wary of them.
  • Why predatory publishing is so attractive to Asian authors; the pressure on them to publish makes it an attractive model for them.
  • How predatory publishing relates to peer review, or the lack of it.

Moderator:

Tamer El Bokl

07 – Editorial Internships: Opportunities for All to Benefit

Speaker:

  • Diane Hackett, Associate Director, Scientific Publishing, MD Anderson Cancer Center
  • Katie Duelm, Managing Editor, Texas A&M University Press
  • Stephen Palmer, PhD, ELS, Senior Scientific Medical Writer, The Texas Heart Institute

Editorial Internships can have a variety of benefits for editorial offices and the interns they host. To aid in achieving this potential, this session will include information and advice from two editors experienced in supervising interns and an early-career editor who recently interned at a journal. Aspects addressed will include defining goals of an internship, finding an intern or internship, structuring an internship, giving feedback to interns, avoiding pitfalls, and maximizing benefits for all involved. The session will include opportunity for audience members to ask questions and share their experience and suggestions. Come join us for a lively and productive discussion!

Learning Objectives:

  • To increase attendees’ knowledge of the goals and potential benefits of editorial internships.
  • To increase attendees’ knowledge of how to find suitable interns or internships.
  • To increase attendees’ ability to plan and conduct effective internships.
  • To encourage editorial offices to institute or continue internships.

Moderator:

Barbara Gastel

08 – Usability and Information Design: Creating Author Instructions that WORK

Speakers:

  • Robert Schumacher, PhD, Executive Vice President, GfK User Centric
  • Yvonne Blanco, Senior Illustrator and Designer, Cell Press

Usability testing is a technique used to evaluate a product or other materials ranging from the interface of a plane cockpit to the design of an online consumer website – by testing it on users. This kind of testing provides direct data on how real users use a system by capturing information that can be used to refine the system to the point that users rarely make errors. In this session, speakers will clearly explain what usability testing and information design are, and how usability testing can be done to help improve journal instructions to authors in measurable ways.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand what usability testing is and its potential to help journals significantly improve their instructions to authors at a reasonable cost.
  • See direct examples of the results of usability testing on instructional materials.
  • Understand how effective writing and instructional on the web are different from other kinds of writing and instructions.

Moderator:

Philippa Benson

09 – Suspected Misconduct: Deciding When and How to Contact Institutions

Speakers:

  • Eric Mah, Senior Director Compliance Office, Office of Ethics and Compliance, University of California, San Francisco
  • Steven L. Shafer, Editor-in-Chief, Anesthesia & Analgesia; Professor of Anesthesiology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford University
  • Veronique Kiermer, Executive Editor and Head of Research Services, Nature Publishing Group, New York

When faced with possible misconduct, editors often dont have access to the information needed to judge a case, but must rely on institutions to investigate. Communication between editors and institutions is therefore vital for the integrity of the scientific record.

The CSE White Paper recommends that journals should have a policy on the editors responsibility for notifying an authors institution of failure to comply with the journals ethical standards and notes that many editors notify the employing institution in suspected misconduct cases if the authors response is unsatisfactory. But the White Paper also suggests this should not be a reflex reaction for editors and that editors should consider the impact such action might have. This session will discuss the COPE recommendations for Cooperation Between Research Institutions and Journal Editors on Research Integrity Cases, and hear views from editors and institutional research integrity officers about how effective cooperation can be achieved.

Learning Objectives:

  • Help develop or revise journal policies on contacting authors institutions.
  • Learn from editors with experience of contacting institutions in different countries.
  • Understand the viewpoint of university Research Integrity Officers.
  • Be more familiar with the COPE guidelines on cooperation between institutions and journals.

Moderator:

Elizabeth Wager

10 – Open Access – What’s New, What’s Worked, What Hasn’t

Speakers:

  • Barbara Goldman, PhD, Director, Journals, American Society for Microbiology
  • Deborah Kahn, Executive Vice President, BioMed Central
  • Kay Robbins, Professor of Computer Science, University of Texas San Antonio
  • Sue T. Griffin, PhD, Professor, Reynolds Department of Geriatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
  • Laurie Goodman, PhD, Editor-in-Chief, Giga Science

In this session, representatives from four different open access (OA) points of view that of an OA publisher, an Editor of an OA journal, a Journals Director at a society with subscription-based journals that has recently launched an OA journal, and an author who publishes in both subscription-based and OA journals will discuss whats new, whats worked, and what hasnt in OA publishing. Speakers will provide an update on the current state of OA publishing, including a discussion of new OA mandates from institutions and funders; new OA initiatives from funding bodies; and the successes and challenges involved in OA publishing.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will gain an understanding of new funder mandates and a snapshot of the current state of OA publishing.
  • Attendees will receive practical advice on launching and managing a successful OA journal.
  • Attendees will understand the impact of open access publishing from the viewpoint of a variety of stakeholders in the scholarly publishing continuum.

Moderator:

Deborah Kahn

11 – More Than a Collection: Applied Uses of Supplemental Data

Speakers:

  • Christine Laine, Editor, Annals of Internal Medicine
  • Liz Williams, PhD, Executive Editor, The Journal of Cell Biology, The Rockefeller University Press
  • William Michener, Professor and Director of eScience Program, University Libraries; Project Director, EPSCoR State Program; Project Director, DataONE, The University of New Mexico

Supplemental Data is being used in extraordinary ways. To illustrate successful data sharing and accessibility initiatives, three examples from societies and journals will be presented. Included will be a description of author requirements, integration with data repositories, and lessons learned.

Learning Objectives:

  • Gain an understanding of practical uses for Supplemental Data.
  • Hear how some publications are making the data available and user-friendly.
  • Discuss access to statistical data about supplemental data usage.
  • Interact with speakers and other annual meeting attendees on the topic of supplemental data.

Moderator:

Anna Jester

12 – Libraries 101

Speakers:

  • Rajia Tobia, AMLS, AHIP, Executive Director of Libraries, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
  • Diane Graves, Assistant Vice President for Information Resources, University Librarian, Trinity University
  • Joan Heath, Associate Vice President, University Librarian, Texas State University

The session, prepared by representatives of the Chicago Collaborative and academic library directors, will give an overview of medical and academic librarians work and the issues they face each day. Discussion points include organizational structure, selection issues, budget concerns, new and emerging institutional roles, and information discovery routines. It is a session prepared by medical and academic librarians for publishers and editors.

Learning Objectives:

  • To learn the basics of what academic and medical librarians do and what goes on in todays academic and medical libraries.
  • To learn about the challenges facing academic and medical librarians and what they are doing to overcome them.
  • To learn about the changes in the roles of academic and medical libraries, and the new roles they are taking on (eg, publishing, big data management, advocacy for improving access to research results).

Moderator:

Paul Schoening

13 – Planning for Continuous Operations in an Emergency

Speakers:

  • Denis G. Baskin, PhD, Executive Editor, The Journal of Histochemistry & Cytochemistry
  • Michael Weston, Executive Publisher, Health & Medical Sciences, STM Journals, Elsevier

Are you prepared to weather the storms such as Katrina in 2005 or a group of deadly town-leveling tornadoes like those in Alabama in April of 2011? Or an office fire or burglary? The potential interruptions are even more risky when journals have staff working at remote sites. In this session, get some emergency preparedness tips from an executive editor on how to prepare your journal office to continue functioning during such calamities. We will also get tips from a publisher on how publishers plan to survive disasters such as these.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn emergency preparedness precautions.
  • How to keep your office running during a complete shutdown.

Moderator:

Angie Schmeckebier

14 – Posts, Tweets, Channels and Likes: Adapting Journal Content for New…

Speakers:

  • Bruce Polsky, Publishing Consultant, Mayo Clinic Proceedings
  • Lori Erickson, MD, Associate Editor, Mayo Clinic Proceedings
  • Patricia (Patty) Baskin, MS, Executive Editor, Neurology Journals, American Academy of Neurology
  • Thomas Gerber, MD, PhD, Associate Editor, Mayo Clinic Proceedings

The session will discuss how to adapt journal content to new modes of delivery, including smart phones and tablets, podcasts and new ways of presenting information. Speakers will present the experience of two Journals, Neurology, and the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, in using these communication approaches as a service to their readers, and as a means for promoting these journals.

Learning Objectives:

  • To discover uses of smart phones, tables and visual media for delivering journal content and communicating with readers.
  • To know practical ways to get started in the use of these new media, and how to adapt journal content to these new modes of delivery.
  • To understand the advantages and potential disadvantages of the uses of these various new media.
  • To learn how to measure the effectiveness of using these media for your journal.

Moderator:

Ingrid Philibert

15 – Big Data Science: Challenges and Opportunities for Authors, Reviewers…

Speakers:

  • Eleonora Presani, Publisher, Elsevier
  • Eugene Kolker, CDO, Seattle Children’s Research Institute
  • Véronique Kiermer, Executive Editor, Director Author & Reviewer Services, Nature Publishing Group

500 quintillionbytes is the estimated size of the Large Hadron Collider daily output if all sensor data were to be recorded, hundreds of times more than all other information in the world. The cost of sequencing human genome has decreased 10,000 times since the milestone publication of the first human genome about a decade ago, resulting in boom of sequencing information at the rate of 2000 human genome equivalents of information per day just at the Beijing Genomics Institute alone. These examples highlight the growing importance of the big data science, and the session will provide an overview of what big data science is, and what challenges and opportunities it poses for some of the key stakeholders in science publishing: authors, reviewers, editors and publishers.

Learning Objectives:

  • Present the current state of the big data science and its publishing needs.
  • Share some of the current best practices from established publishers.
  • Discuss some of the innovation opportunities around the big data science.

16 – Editorial Boards: Nuts and Bolts

Speakers:

  • Barbara M. Ford, President, Meyers Consulting Services
  • Judy Connors, Associate Director, Editorial Services, DIA

Does your journal have a productive editorial board? From criteria for selection to orientation through to operations and daily interactions, we will examine the critically important dynamics of working effectively with an EB. Solid relationships among the Editor, EB, and staff produce solid journals. Bring your experiences to share with the group in a lively Q&A..

Learning Objectives:

  • Why do we have editorial boards? What purpose should they serve a journal?
  • How do you build a productive board? What are the key responsibilities and duties for an effective editorial board?
  • What is the best way to manage an editorial board in terms of meetings, compensation, and recognition?
  • What about diversity on journal editorial boards? What is the compensation of your editorial board? Should you work to change it?

Moderator:

Julie Miller

Monday, 5 May, 2014

Plenary Address

Dr. Howard Bauchner

Evolving Issues in Scholarly Publishing: Open Access; Data Transparency; the Digital World

For over a century, publishing evolved slowly. Print, paper, and mail dominated. Then came the Internet and with it more changes in the last decade then in the last 100 years. Dr. Bauchner will explore issues that editors grapple with including open access, data transparency, questions of fabrication and falsification, the digital space, and the development of a brand. JAMA and The JAMA Network has undergone substantial changes over the past 2 years, including the creation of The JAMA Network, development of a new website, renaming of the network journals, redesign of all 10 journals, and the introduction of an HTLM5 application.

17 – Pinning Contributions to Individuals: Transparency of Credit and…

Speakers:

  • Amy Brand, PhD, Academic & Research Relations, Vice President North America, Digital Science
  • Veronique Kiermer, PhD, Executive Editor and Head of Research Services, Nature Publishing Group
  • Barbara J. Turner, MD, MSED, MA, MACP, Director of ReACH Center (UTHSCSA, UTSPH); Professor of Medicine, Adjunct Professor of Community and Family Medicine, Texas Health Science Center San Antonio
  • Jonathan Dugan, PhD, Director of PLOS Labs, Public Library of Science
  • Diane Scott-Lichter, Vice President, Publishing, American College of Physicians

As long ago as 1997, Drummond Rennie introduced the concept of contributorship. He felt the notion of authorship was flawed as the numbers of authors per article increased and the relationship among them became more complex. In todays world of global, interdisciplinary team-science this complexity continues. Even when definitions for authorship exist in a field or are required by journal policy, they are ambiguous. A more granular approach associated with individual roles in the research and its publication is needed for authors and others. Interest in contributions goes beyond authors and includes readers, funding agencies, academic institutions, editors, and publishers. This session will show how Rennies idea has gained traction since 1997, present perspectives and practical experiences of various stakeholders in attempts to evaluate authorship and contributions, and provide an update on the pilot to identify and measure contributor roles in journals that emerged from an international workshop held by the Wellcome Trust and Harvard University.

Learning Objectives:

Moderator:

Diane Scott-Lichter

18 – Standardizing Data and Data Exchange in Scholarly Publishing

Speakers:

  • Carol Anne Meyer, Business Development and Marketing Manager, CrossRef
  • Elizabeth Blake, Director of Business Development, Inera, Inc.
  • Jay Henry, Vice President, Sales & Marketing, Ringgold
  • Rebecca Bryant, PhD, Director of Community, ORCID

There are several organizations, such as the CrossRef, the National Library of Medicine, ORCID and Ringgold, which are putting forth ideas to standardize data and data exchange throughout scholarly publishing. This session will discuss new initiatives that address such challenges as easily identifying funding sources, managing author disambiguation, managing institution disambiguation, and standardization of information exchange.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the purpose of FundRef and how it can be utilized.
  • Understand ORCID and how it can be utilized.
  • Learn about the Ringgold/ISNI collaboration for disambiguating institution data.
  • Understand the purpose of JATS and how it may affect your publication.

Moderator:

Tony Alves

19 – Journal Indexing

Speakers:

  • David Gillikin, Chief, Bibliographies Services Division, National Library of Medicine
  • Jeffrey Clovis, Senior Director, Global Solutions Support Intellectual Property & Science, Thomson Reuters
  • Wim JN Meester, Senior Product Manager, Scopus-Elsevier

Securing indexing in the major citation databases (MEDLINE, PubMed, Web of Science , SCOPUS) is one of the most important hurdles a journal faces. This can be especially difficult for new journals. This panel will discuss the requirements for indexing and an overview of the review process and selection criteria. This session will be most helpful to journal publishers and Editors, especially those in the process of launching, or proposing to launch, new journals. Additionally, an overview of the process used by PubMed Central to include papers in this database will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

  • An understanding of the process used by various indexing agencies to evaluate journals/journal content for inclusion in these databases.
  • Best practices for submitting a journal for evaluation.

Moderator:

Kim Mitchell

20 – Educational Strategies in Publication Ethics for Asian Authors

Speaker:

  • Donald Samulack, PhD, President, U.S. Operations, Editage/Cactus Communications
  • Jing Duan, PhD, Managing Editor, Acta Ecologica Sinica
  • J. Patrick Barron, Professor Emeritus, Communications and Language, International Communications Center, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan

This session will focus on effective ways to help authors and researchers, primarily those in East Asia, understand and implement good publication practices, standards, and ethics. Discussion will center on how seminars and interactive workshops, webinars, and written resources in the native language can be effective in educating Asian authors about issues such as plagiarism, duplicate publication, and the importance of novel research findings in increasing their chances of publication in Western journals.

Learning Objectives:

  • Educate East Asian authors about good publication practices.
  • Discuss effective ways to carry ou that objective.
  • Present experiences of the panelists in these areas.
  • Suggest ways to overcome the challenges experienced by these authors.

Moderator:

Phillipa Benson

21 – Getting the Word Out: Hands-On Marketing Tools for the Publisher &…

Speakers:

  • Nan Hallock, Director of Publishing, Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening
  • Patty Brady, Editorial Specialist, American Association for Clinical Chemistry

The role of Publisher and Managing Editor often include promoting the Journal content and engaging members. Professionals from different parts of publishing will share practical tools and hands-on experiences on planning a social media marketing campaign and the benefits of using advertising in social media.

Learning Objectives:

  • Gain an understanding of the benefits of advertising using social media.
  • Learn practical tools used in creating a marketing campaign with a small team and/or staff.
  • Explore the area of marketing and promotion and how it will impact your publication.

Moderator:

Sheehan Misko

22 – Editorial and Publication Processes in Developing and Newly…

Speakers:

  • James Tumwine, MBChB, MMed,PhD, Editor, African Health Sciences, Makerere University of Medicine
  • Lila Castellanos-Serra Ph.D., Dr. Sc., National Council for Medical Publications

The session will describe the editorial and publishing process in newly industrialized and developing nations, and how editors manage the publication process, promote journal quality, and work with authors, reviewers and publishers. A particular focus is how editors in less resource rich nations work to overcome barriers to publication at all levels of the editorial and publication process.

Learning Objectives:

  • To learn about the editorial process for international journals.
  • To understand how to successfully manage the editorial and publication process in an environment with constrained resources.
  • To better appreciate barriers to the publication process in newly industrialized and developing nations, as well as how journals in these nations overcome these barriers.
  • To increase awareness among editors and publishers of the challenges facing journals in developing and newly industrialized nations.

Moderator:

Ingrid Philibert

23 – Joint Publications Among Societies – Opportunities and Challenges

Speaker:

  • Morna Conway, PhD, President, Morna Conway, Inc., Scholarly Journal Consulting
  • Kenneth F. Heideman, MS, Director of Publishing, American Meteorological Society

This session will explore the benefits of and challenges associated with joint publication specifically, journals that are published by two or more Societies. For those Societies considering entering into such a partnership, what are some lessons learned by those who have established joint publications? What are the potential benefits of entering into such agreements in terms of expanding readership and scope? Attendees will have the opportunity to ask specific questions, have general concerns addressed, and come away with ideas for improving their own joint publications or perhaps inspired to embark on such a venture.

Learning Objectives:

Moderator:

Kenneth Heideman

24 – Open Peer Review

Speakers:

  • Todd Hummel, Publisher, Clinical Medicine, BioMed Central
  • Trish Groves, MBBS, MRCPsych, Deputy Editor, BMJ and Editor-in-Chief, BMJ Open, BMJ
  • Adam Etkin, Founder and Managing Director, PRE-Score

Open Peer Review has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as more open access journals utilizing the practice have come online. Open Peer Review is not just an open access phenomenon, even traditional and hybrid journals have been exploring Open Peer Review in various ways.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how open peer review has been implemented in various scientific journals.
  • Learn about the challenges that open peer review presents.
  • Learn about the benefits of open peer review for authors, editors and reviewers.
  • Discover some innovative open peer review practices that might work for your journal.

Moderator:

Tony Alves

25 – Ethics Clinic: Legal Issues for Editors and Publishers When Confronting…

Speakers:

  • Debra Parrish, Founding Partner, Parrish Law Offices
  • Lila Castellanos-Serra, PhD, Dr.Sc., Former Executive Editor, Journal Biotecnologia Aplicada, Former Head Dept. Proteomics, Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Havana, Member of the Cuban Academy of Sciences and TWAS (The World Academy of Sciences)

Misconduct allegations can raise numerous legal issues for editors and publishers. Such issues include accepting anonymous allegations; threats of suit for defamation referring an allegation of misconduct to an institution or for retraction; allegations of copyright infringement for publishing allegedly plagiarized material; documentation retention requirements; requests and subpoenas for reviews and reviewer identity during a misconduct investigation; and whistleblower status of an editor or reviewer who identifies possible misconduct during the review of a manuscript or publication. Publishers and editors should appreciate the relevant regulations and laws that exist in various countries and the regulatory bodies, and their authority, that exist in various countries. This session will provide pointers on what editor and publishers can do to minimize the risk of becoming involved in litigation based on a misconduct allegation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Minimizing the risk of litigation associated with a misconduct trial.
  • Legal requirements to retain and produce information and participate in a misconduct investigation.
  • A review of lawsuits involving editors and publishers and allegations of misconduct.

Moderator:

Debbie Parrish

26 – Rapidly Changing Publishing Technology: Ignore it at Your Own Risk

Speakers:

  • David Haber, Publishing Workflow Analyst, Cenveo
  • Jeff Beck, Technical Information Specialist, National Center for Biotechnology Information, American Chemical Society
  • Jim King, Director of Publishing Technology, American Chemical Society

This session looks at changing publishing technology and why it matters to the preservation of scientific content. Our panelists discuss how technology impacts business models such as Open Access, why archiving data and storage matters, and how new technologies enable users to get more from the content.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discover how publishing technology is changing.
  • Learn why this matters to authors and individuals accessing content.
  • Find out why publishing technology matters to Open Access titles, Orcid and FundRef.

Moderator:

Julie Nash

27 – Behind the Scenes with Style Guides: How Updates are Made and Manuals…

Speakers:

  • Cheryl Iverson, Co-Chair, AMA Manual of Style Committee, JAMA Network
  • David Morrow, Senior Editor, University of Chicago Press
  • Peter J. Olson, ELS, Senior Copyediting Coordinator, Sheridan/Dartmouth Journal Services

Similar to dictionaries, style guides seem to be updated fairly frequently. It never fails that as soon as you finally get the hang of a certain style point, the manual is updated and style points changed. Some of the updates may seem arbitrary, while others are clearly much-needed and welcomed by those who use them. We’ll take a behind-the-scenes look at how style manual updates are made and explore the process of how a new journal goes about deciding which style manual to follow.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about the processes several societies follow once the decision is made to update their style guide.
  • Discover how a new journal can decide which style guide to follow and how to incorporate changes made in new editions.
  • Learn about the advantages of developing a supplemental style guide to address style points that are specific to a journal.

Moderator:

Tom Lang and Lindsey Buscher

28 – Reference and Networking Tools: New Ways to Read, Store, and Share

Speakers:

  • Christine Buske, PhD, Head of Outreach & Relationship Development, Papers/Springer SBM
  • Jeff Lang, Platform Manager, Web Editions, American Chemical Society
  • Laura Kuo, MLIS, MPA, AHIP, Health Sciences Librarian, Ithaca College Library
  • Roy Kaufman, Managing Editor, New Ventures, Copyright Clearance Center

Explore the development and acquisition of personal research library / academic social network systems by publishing groups.Speakers will address the development of these tools, how they function and are used by researchers, as well as licensing and other implications for journals and publishing.

Learning Objectives:

Moderator:

Mary Billingsley

Sarah Tegen

29 – Will Video Kill the PDF Star?

Speaker:

  • Gillian Shasby, Director of Publications-Operations, JNS Publishing Group
  • Moshe Pritsker, CEO, JoVE

Viral Videos, including the type that actually make you feel queasy for one reason or another, are everywhere, even garnering coverage on the news. What are publishers, journals, and other organizations doing with video and video podcasts? Will video become something every journal provides in the future? If so, will they supplement or replace XML and PDFs?

Learning Objectives:

  • Gain an understanding of why the speakers’ organizations begin publishing video.
  • Gain an understanding of how scholarly publishing videos are created.
  • Discuss access to statistical data about video usage.
  • Interact with speakers and other annual meeting attendees contemplating implementation of a video program.

Moderator:

Anna Jester

30 – Crowdsourcing: Using Your Readers to Generate New Information and Solve…

Speakers:

  • Ingrid Philibert, PhD, MBA, Executive Managing Editor, Journal of Graduate Medical Education, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education
  • Jill Waalen, MD, MPH, Deputy Editor, American Journal of Preventive Medicine, The Scripps Research Institute

The session will discuss how journal engage readers as a form of crowdsourcing to identify new ways of addressing complex problems of interest to the journals audience , or to expand existing definitions highly relevant to journal readers. The session will summarize the experience of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine in using crowdsourcing to solicit ideas on approaches and practical interventions to address childhood obesity, and the efforts of the Journal of Graduate Medical Education to engage readers in the development of a practical definition of quality in medical education research from the perspective of the users of this information.

Learning Objectives:

  • To describe current trends in crowdsourcing and to appreciate how this approach uses a wide range of largely unknown individuals to generate information of interest.
  • To learn how some journals have engaged readers in idea generation and problem solving by soliciting their input through “crowdsourcing.”
  • To receive practical tips for how to get started in engaging readers in generating information of relevance and use to a journal.
  • To understand the information on the utility of crowdsourcing and the benefits and pitfalls of this approach in the context of use by a scientific journal.

Moderator:

Ingrid Philibert

31 – How Did I Get Here? Perspective of a Volunteer

Speaker:

  • Angela Cochran, Director, Journals, ASCE
  • Kenneth F. Heideman, MS, Director of Publications, American Meteorological Society

The collective brain trust of CSE members is powerful. Many of us ended up at CSE via circuitous routes, perhaps dragged in by a boss or coworker, and we all bring random professional histories to the table. CSE leaders will lead an informal discussion on their work history and history with CSE, why we volunteer, what we have gotten out of it, and then take questions from the audience.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn why we volunteer.
  • Learn about career paths.
  • Benefits of volunteering.

Moderator:

Heather Goodell

32 – Is a Virtual Office Right for You?

Speaker:

  • Julie Nash, Senior Partner, J&J Editorial
  • Charles Trowbridge, Assistant Director, Peer Review Operations, American Chemical Society
  • Kerry O’Rourke, Managing Editor, Kaufman Wills Fusting & Company

Technology allows us to easily embrace a virtual workplace. This workplace could involve remote staff members, vendor-contractors, or even a completely virtual office. Making the decision to move aspects of your business to the cloud isnt easy. The speakers at this session will outline for you some of the considerations necessary for moving to the cloud and will speak about their experiences.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the components of a virtual workplace.
  • Learn about managing vendor-contractors.
  • Tips for managing a remote group.

Moderator:

Sarah Tegen