CSE 2015 Annual Meeting

Sunday, 17 May, 2015

Keynote Address: The Research Data Revolution

G. Sayeed Choudhury

Data are the basis of the articles we publish in our journals. The conservation and curation of those articles, issues, and volumes is a problem we have largely solved. However, data represent a new frontier for usthey are largely field- and instrument-specific, which means their sharing and conservation are a larger challenge. The amount of data is exploding every year. And funding bodies are beginning to suggest policies for data sharing and retention for their grantees. With these challenges, publishers have vast opportunities to help establish standards for curation, preservation, and reproducibility. With these opportunities, editors and publishers are tantalizingly poised to develop new tools and services to provide to contributors, libraries and grantors. Frequent speaker on this topic, Sayeed Choudhury will explore those challenges and opportunities that data represent for us.

1.1 Conquering the Production of Mathematical Content

Speakers:

  • Kaveh Bazargan, PhD, Director, River Valley Technologies
  • Michael Friedman, PhD, Journals Production Manager, American Meteorological Society
  • John Gardner, President & Founder, ViewPlus Technologies, Inc., Professor Emeritus, Oregon State University
  • Gil Poulin, Production Editor, American Mathematical Society

Mathematical content has always been classed as “penalty material” for typesetting. Even before the electronic age, setting mathematical type was a specialized task.Requirements for online delivery have added to the complexity with the requirement for XML/MathML for rendering in the browser and for future re-use. LaTeX authors are very particular about the quality of typesetting and become irate when proofs are of low quality. The session will discuss best practices and workflows for processing mathematical content and also discuss dealing with authors and author instructions.

Learning Objectives:

    1. Gain a deeper understanding of the perils of, approaches to, and future direction of processing mathematical content.

Moderator:

Kaveh Bazargan, River Valley Technologies

1.2 – Emerging Standards: Data and Data Exchange in Scholarly Publishing

Speakers:

  • Helen Atkins, Director, Publishing, Public Library of Science
  • Amy Brand, PhD, Vice President, Academic & Research Relations, Digital Science
  • Jay Henry, Vice President, Sales & Marketing, Ringgold
  • Rachael Lammey, Product Manager, CrossRef

There are several organizations, such as the CrossRef, ORCID, CASRAI and Ringgold, that are putting forth ideas to standardize data and data exchange throughout scholarly publishing. This session will discuss new initiatives that address such challenges as easily identifying funding sources, managing author disambiguation and contributorship in scholarly publishing, and managing institution disambiguation. The session will wrap up with a real-life exploration of how some of these emerging standards are being implemented at a major publishing organization.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the purpose of FundRef and how it can be utilized.
  2. Learn about recent initiatives for a standardized taxonomy for contributors, and why this is important in scholarly publishing.
  3. Learn about the Ringgold/ISNI collaboration for disambiguating institution data and understand why this data is useful.
  4. Understand how emerging standards are being integrated into a real-life publishing program.

Moderator:

Tony Alves, Aries Systems

1.3 – Different Forms of Peer Review

Speakers:

  • Adam Etkin, Founder and Managing Director, PRE Peer Review Evaluation
  • Jody Plank, Rubriq Product Manager, Research Square
  • Chi Van Dang, Professor & Director, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Member, eLife’s Board of Reviewing Editors

In this session we plan to discuss different models of peer review. We plan to cover pre-submission peer review, different models of journal peer review and assessment of the peer review process post acceptance.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn how pre-submission peer review runs and how it intersects with traditional peer review models.
  2. Discuss alternative methods of peer review, including open peer review and post-acceptance peer review.
  3. Discover how peer review is rated and evaluated once papers are published and how that impacts the journal and its processes.

Moderator:

Julie Nash, J&J Editorial, Inc.

1.4 – Best Practices in Preventing Authorship Problems

Speakers:

  • Annette Flanagin, Executive Managing Editor, Vice President Editorial Operations, JAMA and the JAMA Network
  • Jennifer Mahar, Executive Peer Review Manager, Origin Editorial
  • Deborah Poff, PhD, Editor, Journal of Business Ethics, Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Academic Ethics

The speakers for this session will represent several perspectives and disciplines in publishing; humanities and social sciences, biomedicine and physical sciences. We will provide a panel presentation revolving around a discussion for authorship within these various disciplines and authorship issues. We intend to provide the participants with tools to assist in management of issues that arise related to authorship within their journals, scopes and disciplines. By sharing best practices, workflows and views in different areas we will expose areas each journal could consider to improve their communication with authors, to reduce authorship disputes, and to become proactive in their management of authorship issues.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will receiving help in defining authorship.
  2. Participants will receive advice on best practices to curtail authorship disputes.
  3. Participants will receive guidance on providing information for author’s guidelines, online system, etc.
  4. Participants will be able to handle authorship disputes.

Moderators:

Charon Pierson

2.1 – Managing Journals in a Global Context

Speakers:

  • Silvia Buntinx, Editor-in-Chief, Veterinarai Mexico Journal
  • Carly McCuig, Managing Editor, Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Canadian Association of Medical Radiation Technologists
  • Aaron Weinstein, Managing Editor, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery | PRS Global Open, American Society of Plastic Surgeons

There are many reasons for journals to take advantage of international opportunities. Many journals have broadened the scope of their editorial boards to be more international a key factor in being accepted into major abstracting and indexing services. Journals are trying to attract readers and well-known authors from other countries. The issues journals have faced and the solutions they have found may surprise you and hold lessons for your publication.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the benefits of attracting international readers, authors, and editorial board members. (These include being accepted into major indexes, broadened scope, new viewpoints, expanded reputation.)
  2. Learn from case studies some of the difficulties encountered in reaching goals for greater international scope and markets, as well as some of the successful approaches.

Moderator:

Carolyn Brown, Independent Consultant

2.2 – By the Numbers: Evaluation Strategies to Improve Journal Performance

Speakers:

  • Etta Kavanagh, Editorial Manager, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)
  • Alexis Wynne Mogul, Senior Managing Editor, KWF Editorial Services
  • Christina Nelson, Peer Review Manager, The Journal of Bones and Joint Surgery, Inc.
  • Jonathan Schultz, Managing Editor, Circulation Research, American Heart Association
  • Marc F. Swiontkowski, MD, Editor-in-Chief, The Journal of Bone and Joint Surbery, Inc.

Journals must measure and monitor each step in the peer review process in these times of tight budgets and increased competition. Our panel of experts will share their experiences and present practical advice about how to implement evaluation metrics for everyone involved.

What tools can you use to measure improvement in the quality of submissions? Its getting tougher to find good reviewers and keep them happy. How can you reduce their burden? How do you grade reviews? Editors need a report card, too. What metrics are most meaningful and are under their control? You review staff members them annually. Are there better benchmarks you could be using?

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify specific evaluation metrics for different journal constituencies.
  2. Explain how these metrics can be implemented.
  3. Describe the benefits of implementing these metrics for a journal.
  4. Recommend evaluation metrics for different types of journals.

Moderator:

Alexis Mogul, KWF Editorial Services

2.3 – Starting New Open Access Journals

Speaker:

  • Patty Baskin, Executive Editor, Neurology Journals, American Academy of Neurology
  • Suzanne Kettley, Director of Publishing Operations, Canadian Science Publishing
  • Cameron Macdonald, Executive Editor, Canadian Science Publishing

This session will focus on new open-access initiatives and start-ups by publishers and societies: speakers will share success stories on different models of generating content for new open-access journals, especially those with experience from societies or publishers with new open-access initiatives.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Attendees will learn how the changing needs of scholars created new opportunities and challenges for publishers.
  2. Speakers will provide a brief update on the current state of OA publishing.
  3. Speakers will give practical advice on launching a new OA journal from publishers who recently launched OA journals.
  4. Speakers will reflect on the impact of open access publishing from the viewpoint of the society and smaller publisher.

Moderator:

Tamer Elbokl, Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)

2.4 – Advertising and the Scholarly Journal: Selling Audience

Speakers:

  • Stefan Bradham,CAE, MSM, Deputy Director of Society Management Services & Marketing, Federation of American Societies For Experimental Biology
  • Jonathan Christison, Director of Commercial Business Development for Cell Press, Elsevier
  • Christopher Hoag, President and Director, Kenyon Hoag Associates
  • Stephanie Holland, Manager, Advertising Sales & Marketing, American Chemical Society Publications

As we seek to increase the diversity of revenue streams for our journals, advertising can fill an important niche. Today, more than ever, we have the opportunity to place ads on more and varied placesfrom mobile to webpages to printed pages and virtual events. However, weve sometimes struggled to determine which advertising content is appropriate in our journal. Advertisers more than ever are interested in reaching niche audiences, which provides an excellent opportunity for scholarly publishers to leverage the power of our audience, while diversifying our media portfolios. This session will explore current advertising practices and opportunities.

Learning Objectives:

  1. What types of media channels and advertising programs are advertisers looking for today?
  2. How can scholarly publishers diversify their media portfolios in order to meet advertiser demand?
  3. What are the ethical concerns surrounding advertising in scholarly journals?
  4. How can publishers engage with potential brands and advertisers beyond the transaction and form long time partnerships?

Moderator:

Stephanie Holland, American Chemical Society Publications

3.1 – Preparing a Manuscript when English is a Second Language

Speakers:

  • David I. Hanauer, Professor of Applied Linguistics/English, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
  • Donald Samulack, PhD, President, U.S. Operations, Editage/Cactus Communications
  • Jeri Marie Wright, Publications Manager, PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, PLOS

Science is now a global enterprise, and many publishers are seeing a sharp increase in manuscript submissions from authors whose second language is English. Formal scientific education often doesnt emphasize written communications, and the lack of writing skills is further compounded when English is a second language. The speakers at this session discuss their experiences working with authors whose second language is English.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Develop an awareness of research on writing science in a second language.
  2. Understand problems faced by authors who write scientific papers when English is a second language.
  3. Learn about an active journal program to work with authors in 2nd and 3rd world countries.

Moderator:

Anne Coghill, American Chemical Society

3.2 – Embracing the Constant Change in Media Relations

Speakers:

  • Tom Champoux, Director of Communications, American Meteorological Society
  • Preeti Malani, MD, MSJ, JAMA Associate Editor, JAMA/University of Michigan
  • Tom Reller, Vice President, Global Corporate Relations, Elsevier

It used to be simple: coordinate with your public information office and an authors institution to create a press release. That was the way to promote the journal article and the journal. Now, instant social media, a faster production cycle, and a changing understanding of what it means to add value all force the message to get out more quickly and across multiple channels. In this session, you will learn how scholarly communication and publication departments coordinate to get information out quickly, what is replacing the press release, and how social media, under your control or not, is playing an ever-increasing role in the value proposition. The changing value equation, and who your audience should be, are keys in the every changing communications landscape. Is your organization reacting or planning and anticipating?

Learning Objectives:

  1. Be appraised of current state of media relations.
  2. Learn new tactics for communicating journal information.
  3. Take away tools/checklists to improve or change communication avenues.

Moderator:

Victoria Forlini, American Geophysical Union

3.3 – Copyright Best Practices: From Traditional Transfers to Liberal Licenses

Speakers:

  • Carolyn Brown, Consultant, Science & Medicine | Writing & Editing | Publishing Consultant
  • Tracey DePellegrin Connolly, Executive Editor, Genetics Society of America
  • Christopher McKenzie, Vice President of Golbal Intellectural Property, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Do you (or your attorneys) stay awake at night worrying about what will happen if a copyright dispute goes to court? What are current copyright best practices? Do all co-authors need to sign a copyright transfer? Should you move your journal to a more liberal license model? With advances in digital publishing and growth of Open Access, many publishers copyright policies are evolving. This session will present real Editorial Office experiences with updating copyright practices, as well as a publishers view of the current copyright climate.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Gain a sense of copyright issues that other journals and publishers face, and the solutions they implement.
  2. Understand current best practices for copyright collection in scientific publishing.
  3. Learn about copyright/license models in common use.

Moderator:

Amanda Ferguson, Institute of Food Technologists

3.4 – Publishing Questions – Data Informed Solutions

Speakers:

  • Helen Atkins, Director, Publishing Services, Public Library of Science
  • Annette Flanagin, Director, Publishing Services, Public Library of Science
  • Heather Goodell, Director, Scientific Publishing, American Heart Association
  • Kenneth F. Heideman, MS, Director of Publications, The American Meteorological Society
  • Diane Scott-Lichter, Vice President, Publishing, American College of Physicians

The session will consist of lightening talks delivered by presenters describing their work-related, practical questions and how they used data to draw informed answers. Is the content you create valued? Does cascading manuscripts and reviews make sense for your publications? Can you predict the fate of submissions and develop better workflows as a result? Will your journal be financially viable if you move from a subscription to an open access model? Does a social media campaign benefit your scholarly article/journal? Come prepared to appreciate that many things can be counted but some things are not easily measured.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn from a variety of case studies how individuals have used data to address editorial and publishing questions.
  2. Understand what data is available and how it may be used for the session topics.

Moderator:

Diane Scott-Lichter, American College of Physicians

4.1 – The Next Generation of Researchers

Speakers:

  • Frederick Fenter, Executive Editor, Frontiers, Frontiers for Young Minds
  • Alexandre (Sacha) Noukhovitch, PhD, Editor-in-Chief, Executive Editor, Canadian Young Scientist Journal
  • Jamie Vernon, PhD, Director of Science Communications and Publications, Editor-in-Chief, American Scientist, Sigma Xi

Good authors and editors arent born, they are made. This session will explore three exciting initiatives to engage students of ALL ages in science, research, and scholarly publishing. One speaker will discuss student journals at the university level, exploring challenges and opportunities. Another speaker will discuss a new research journal for high school students and talk about ways to encourage this age group to conduct and publish valuable research. Lastly, we will hear about an exciting way that one publisher is engaging students as young as middle school in the review and evaluation of technical scientific content.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Explore the role of student journals in training the next generation of researchers and editors.
  2. Learn about efforts to engage high school students that want to publish research.
  3. Discuss the challenges of keeping student journals afloat when editorial board members graduate.
  4. Look at new ways that students may be sharing their research and scientific ideas.

Moderator:

Angela Cochran, American Society of Civil Engineers

4.2 – Taxonomy

Speakers:

  • Monica Bradford, Executive Editor, AAAS
  • Marjorie Hlava, President, Access Innovations, Inc.
  • Charlotte McNaughton, Director of Publishing Technologies, ASCE

Everyone seems to be creating a taxonomy these days. But what are we doing with them? How are we making access to the literature we publish better or easier for our readers? This session will focus on publishers who have created a taxonomy for their publication(s) and 1) what public-facing applications they have built or used to highlight their content, and 2) what internal uses they may have have made of the data generated.

Learning Objectives: TBD

Moderator:

Margie Hlava, Access Innovations

4.3 – Data Availability Policies: How Do We Check for Compliance?

Speakers:

  • Rebecca Barr, Manager, Copy Editors (Nature Research Journals), Macmillan Science & Scholarly Publishing
  • Jessica Herzog, Editorial Manager, PLOS ONE, PLOS
  • Cathy Stack, PhD, Deputy Editor, Statistics, American College of Physicians

Big data is in the news, and its being referred to and built on in the articles we publish. Increasingly, journals are setting policies that require authors to make their data available. Some journals require that it be part of the peer review process; some require that the author make it available after publication, upon request; and others are now requiring that the authors make the data publicly available prior to publication. The datasets may be housed on journal sites, on the authors institutional website, in a third-party repository, or ? This session will review how a set of publishers are dealing with data availability issues on a day-to-day basis. Well learn what they have discovered about author compliance with their journals policies, and what it takes in the editorial/production office to ensure that compliance.

Learning Objectives: TBD

Moderator:

Helen Atkins, PLOS

4.4 – Communicating with Readers and Engaging Them Through the Use of Technology

Speakers:

  • Patty Baskin, Executive Editor, Neurology Journals, American Academy of Neurology
  • Sheehan Misko, Managing Editor, Publications of the AACC, American Association for Clinical Chemistry
  • Ingrid Philibert, PhD, Executive Managing Editor, Journal of Graduate Medical Education, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education

New technology, including use of the web and social media are changing the approaches for journals to communicate with readers, and readers to respond. This session will highlight examples of how journals have developed successful programs to communicate with and engage readers or particular reader subgroups, expanding on and repurposing published content. The session will present several specific examples of the use of technology to engage readers, focusing on particular reader audiences, with the objective of expanding the reach of the journal and to engage reader input and engagement, by readers and viewers into a community of active stakeholders.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Show examples of the uses of technology such as author facilitated discussions, repurposed material and information surrounding published articles such as author videos to engage and activate readers to turn them into active stakeholders.
  2. Present examples of how journals have leveraged linkages to specific reader audiences using expanded and repurposed content.
  3. Highlight potential audiences of interest, such as trainee and learner populations, who may have different needs, and who are a valuable stakeholder group as potential future readers.
  4. Provide several practical case studies to demonstrate the impact of the use of new technology in reaching out and engaging readers.

Moderator:

Ingrid Philibert, ACGME

Monday, 18 May, 2015

Plenary Address: The Future of Thought

Clive Thompson

How are online communication tools changing the way people think? In this talk, Thompson will discuss his research into the new ways that everyday people learn about the world, form ideas, and share them. He’ll discuss the “audience effect”, how everyday “thinking out loud” changes the nature of our ideas, and how the new literacies of video and photography. This session is essential for anyone who wants to understand the way that science news travels and is discussed by today’s connected readers.

5.1 – Disclosures of Potential Conflicts of Interest: Authors & Beyond

Speakers:

  • Gary Curhan, MD, ScD, Editor-in-Chief, Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, Brigham and Womens Hospital
  • Christine Laine, MD, MPH, Editor-in-Chief, Annals of Internal Medicine
  • Heather Pierce, Senior Director, Science Policy Regulatory Council, Scientific Affairs, Association of American Medical Colleges

This session will provide an overview on the topic of disclosing potential conflicts of interest (COI) and unveil a new universal online disclosure program. The session opens with an explanation of the importance of collection and dissemination of disclosures by an International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) member. Then, it will feature the perspective of an Editor-in-Chief on the importance and process of collecting and sharing editor and editorial board member disclosures. Finally, the session concludes with a presentation on the AAMCs work to develop a centralized COI disclosure database and a first-time demonstration of the secure online system.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Provide overview of disclosures of potential Conflicts of Interest (COI).
  2. Provide editors perspective on collecting and sharing disclosures of potential COI from editors and editorial board members.
  3. Present overview and demonstration of Convey, AAMCs new centralized database system to harmonize disclosures.

Moderator:

Shari Leventhal, CJASN

5.2 – Dealing with Metadata: Content, Distribution, and Availability

Speakers:

  • Todd Carpenter, Executive Editor, National Information Standards Organization (NISO)
  • Marjorie Hlava, President, Access Innovations, Inc., Data Harmony
  • Matt Stratton, Technical Lead, IT Operations, AIP LLC
  • Marcia Zeng, Professor, School of Library and Information Science, Kent State University

Metadata can be an amorphous thing. What exactly is it? Why is it important? How is it used and applied? This session will try to cut through the haze and answer these questions by describing specific examples and tools publishers are employing for the organization of bibliographic data and promoting the distribution, discovery, and availability of content to user communities. As something that is part of every stage of an articles life from submission through production to delivery to users, this session should appeal to editorial, production, and technology professionals alike.

Learning Objectives:

    1. Deeper understanding of the importance of metadata, and its implementation and associated tools.

Moderator:

Michael Friedman, American Meteorological Society

5.3 Assessing a Journal’s Impact: Article-Level Metrics and Our Editorial…

Speakers:

  • Christine Casey, MD, Editor, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports (MMWR) Serials, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Kerry Kroffe, Senior Editorial Manager, PLOS ONE, PLOS
  • Christina Mills, MD, Managing and Scientific Editor, MEDICC Review

In todays scientific environment, counting citations is no longer a sufficient measure of impact. Funders and the community at large demand new ways of measuring the broader impact of research output. Alternative methods have thus emerged to assess the social and academic reach of individual research papers. This session will focus on the social responsibility to measure the impact of the science we publish and will guide journals in what they should invest in to meet this need, and how they should use these new measures.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To understand the value of a narrative framework (i.e., beyond bibliometrics) to assess the impact of a scientific publication.
  2. To review how PLOS has enabled the scientific community and specifically authors to provide a more complete view of a scientific work’s impact outside the limitations of the Impact Factor.
  3. To discuss the social responsibility of medical and public health journals and their role in increasing global health equity, and identify possible indicators for a theoretical framework for assessing related performance.

Moderator:

Carissa A. Gilman, American Cancer Society

5.4 – Statistical Review of Manuscripts: View from the Trenches

Speaker:

  • Eliseo Guallar, MD, PhD, Professor, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • Tom Lang, MA, Principal, Tom Lang Communications and Training International
  • Mary Beth Schaeffer, Managing Editor, Annals of Internal Medicine

As issues about the irreproducibility of much scientific data have some to light, it seems even more urgent for journals to consider adding statistical and/or methodological review during peer review of manuscripts. During this session, we will highlight why statistical review has become increasingly important and how journals are addressing the need for more scrutiny of statistics and methods. How do you find and retain statistical reviewers? What manuscripts need special review? Are their reporting guidelines to help? What are your workflow considerations? What do your statistical reviewers think? These questions and more will be discussed by a managing editor and statisticians who work as reviewers and who contribute academically to the field.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To understand why scrutiny of the reporting of statistics and other methods is important.
  2. To discern what types of studies and which type of statistics might require statistical review.
  3. To learn about different workflows that can be used at your journal.
  4. To discover how to find and retain statistical reviewers.

Moderator:

Kristi Overgaard, Editorial Consultant

6.1 – Peer Review Ethics: Do Journals need to Ensure that Reviewers Behave…

Speakers:

  • Carol Carr, Managing Editor, Organic Letters
  • Ivan Oransky, Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine
  • Darren B. Taichman, MD,PhD, Executive Deputy Editor, Anals of Internal Medicine

Many journals have programs designed to ensure that authors behave ethically. Do journals need similar safeguards for reviewers? Concerns about reviews written by authors masquerading as reviewers spiked in 2014. The speakers in this session will explore the need to ensure that reviewers behave ethically, and what editors and journals might do to remind reviewers of their ethical responsibilities in the peer review process.

Learning Objectives:

  1. How big a problem do we have? Are faked reviews a common problem?
  2. Do journals need to more proactively ensure that reviewers are who they say they are?
  3. What could, or should, journals be doing?

Moderator:

Anne Coghill, American Chemical Society

6.2 – Assessing and Monitoring the Health of an STM Journal

Speakers:

  • Brooks Hanson, Director of Publishing, American Geophysical Union
  • Margaret Perkins, MS, Director of Manuscript Editing, The New England Journal of Medicine
  • Julie Steffen, Director of Publishing, American Astronomical Society

How do we know that a journal is healthy or successful? Is it by the size of the subscription base? The financial bottom line? The Impact Factor ranking? The number of submissions? Or can we measure it by some combination of these and other metrics? How about subjective factors such as the quality of peer review? If only there were some standard formula for determining this. The truth is that the health of a journal is in the eye of the beholder, with the beholder being the publisher, the editor, or the reader of the journal. During this session we will discuss objective and subjective ways to assess and monitor the overall health of a journal on an ongoing basis and what treatment approaches may be useful if we find that it is less than optimal. There is no right answer to this. Please bring your own ideas to share if you are so inclined!

Learning Objectives:

  1. To discuss the general concept of journal health from varying perspectives (publisher, editor, reader).
  2. To identify and discuss metrics useful for evaluating the health of a journal.
  3. To discuss ways to shore up a journal that is not doing as well as it could or should be doing.

Moderator:

Ken Heideman, American Meteorological Society

6.3 – Journal Training Wheels: Building a Pipeline of Future Authors, Reviewer..

Speaker:

  • Michelle Horner, DO, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
  • Kathleen Pieper, Managing Editor, Neurology, American Academy of Neurology
  • Jason Roberts, PhD, Executive Editor, Headache

The session will present examples of initiatives and programs geared toward engaging residents, fellows, and early career individuals in scholarly publishing training wheels experiences to develop a rich pipeline of interested and engaged future authors, reviewers, and editors.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Discover models for engaging junior society members in the editorial process.
  2. Consider the importance of developing a rich pipeline of interested and engaged future authors, reviewers, and editors.
  3. Discuss recommendations for operationalizing new, similar programs.
  4. Identify positives and negatives (potential benefits and pitfalls) of launching training wheels programs.

Moderator:

Mary K. Billingsley, American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

6.4 – Ethics Clinic: Failure to Produce Data

Speakers:

  • Debbie Parrish, Founder, Parrish Law

Data availability, sharing and retention policies are evolving. Independent of data policies, a number of research misconduct cases have involved allegations of data fabrication or falsification and the subsequent revelation that many of the authors never saw the data and the data are now missing. This need for original data, to confirm the integrity of a publication, raises questions regarding author’s obligations to review the data even when they are not the author generating such data and the obligation to produce it when questions arise. This session will be an active session exploring those questions and issues as participants work through two scenarios.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the importance and implications of data policies.
  2. Understand the legal consequences of author’s failure to produce data.

Moderator:

Debbie Parrish, Founder, Parrish Law

7.1 – Taking Author Instructions to the Next Level

Speakers:

  • Jacob Kendall-Taylor, Assistant Editorial Manager, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Sciences
  • Jody Hundley, Production Manager, Scientific Publishing, American Heart Association
  • David Martinsen, Senior Scientist, Digital Strategy, American Chemical Society

Do you sometimes suspect that many authors dont bother reading your journals submission instructions? Often reading like long essays, these instructions can seem forbidding, and their readers may fail to grasp important information about the submission, review, and publication processes, causing difficulties down the line. Since a picture can be worth a thousand words, and illustrations and other display items are widely known to make dense material more reader friendly, can we apply those principles in creating author instructions? Our speakers will discuss ways to structure author guidelines effectively and describe alternative means to convey information about journal policies and processes that theyve created as adjuncts to textual information, such as infographics delineating the publication process, videos to illustrate tricky aspects of figure preparation, and FAQs.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Encourage editors and editorial offices to take a hard look at their instructions for authors.
  2. Provide ideas about alternative ways to convey policy and procedural information to authors, including display items.

Moderator:

Rebecca Barr, Nature Publishing

7.2 – Self-Publishing or Contract Publishing: Understanding the Advantages…

Speakers:

  • Audra E. Cox, PhD, ELS, Managing Editor, American Society for Investigative Pathology
  • Cara Kaufman, MBA, Managing Partner, Kaufman Wills Fusting & Company
  • Judie Lieu, Senior Director of Innovation, The Gerontological Society of America
  • Ann Murphy, PhD, President, CEO and Publisher, The AlphaMed Company, Inc

Publishing professionals often are questioned about their current publishing model from multiple sources within their respective organizations. The purpose of this session is to discuss the advantages and potential disadvantages of self-publishing or contract publishing. Gain a better understanding of which model might work best for your organization by listening to and asking questions of publishing professionals with expertise in facilitating a transition to or from self-publishing to a commercial or university press publisher.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Gain insight into the advantages or potential disadvantages of each publishing model.
  2. Understand the criteria of considering a move towards either publishing model.

Moderator:

Donald McClain, Crimson Interactive

7.3 – Manuscript Integrity

Speakers:

  • Anne Coghill, Manager, Peer Review Operations, Global Editorial and Author Services, ACS Publications
  • Chuck Koscher, Director of Technology, CrossRef
  • Gwendolyn Whittaker, Publications Coordinator & Peer Review Support Manager, American Meteorological Society

This session will describe the technology available to journals to help prevent plagiarism. It will follow one journals pilot project and how the lessons learned influenced the rollout of CrossCheck to all journal in the ACS Publications portfolio.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn about new techniques that can be used to prevent plagiarism.
  2. Understand the process of implementing technology to prevent plagiarism.

Moderator:

Angie Schmeckebier, American Journal of Pathology/Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham

7.4 – The 5-Step Authorship Framework Developed by MPIP

Speakers:

  • TBD

The Medical Publishing Insights and Practices (MPIP) Initiative, a collaboration of members of the pharmaceutical industry and the International Society for Publication Professionals (ISMPP), seeks to elevate trust and transparency in publishing industry-sponsored studies. MPIP recently collaborated with a group of journal editors to develop recommendations to improve transparency in disclosing contributors to industry-sponsored clinical trial publications. The presentation will review how the recommendations were developed, an overview of the 5- step framework, and implications for industry, manuscript authors, and journal editors. Conference participants will be encouraged to give feedback.

Learning Objectives:

    1. Inform participants, especially editors, about contributor recommendations for industry studies.

Moderator:

Patricia Baskin, American Academy of Neurology

8.1 – Web Traffic: Ideas and Examples

Speaker:

  • Karen Barry, Managing Editor, American Heart Association
  • Judy Connors, Association Editorial Director, Managing Editor, TIRS and Global Forum
  • Glenn Landis, Editorial Director, Blood, American Society of Hematology
  • Morgan Sorenson, Managing Editor, Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflamation
  • Darren Taichman, MD, PhD, Executive Deputy Editor, Annals of Internal Medicine

It seems like all of us are worried out the web traffic to our journals. What can we do to increase the traffic to the sites? Should we be happy to increase the number of the right people who find our site and benefit from our content? How can we reach our target audience at the article level?

Learning Objectives:

  1. Review the different types of web traffic.
  2. Discuss search optimization ideas what can journals do to find the right people and get them to stay on your site for more than a minute.
  3. Discuss where your online usage is going instead of your journal.
  4. Provide examples of journals that conducted studies of social medias impact.

Moderator:

Judy Connors, DIA

8.2 – Dynamic Disruptors: A series of lightning talks from various start-ups

Speakers:

  • Peter Armstrong, Co-Founder, LeanPub
  • Kaveh Bazargan, PhD, CEO, River Valley Technologies
  • Brian Bishop, Founder, Forcite
  • Michal Duczmal, Relationship Manager, Annotate.co
  • John Hammersley, PhD, Co-Founder, CEO, Overleaf
  • Natalie Jonk, Founder, Walacea
  • Mitar Milutinovic, PhD, Founder, Peer Library
  • Nick Oswald, PhD, Founder, BiteSize Bio
  • Andrew Preston, PhD, Founder, Publons
  • Greg Tebutt, PhD, Sparrho
  • Cindy Wu, Co-Founder, Experiment

A series of lighting talks from gifted entrepreneurs with new ideas about scholarly communication. The session will be a series of rapid fire talks exploring how scholarly communication is changing at every level, from new ways to get funded, to collaborative authorship tools, to new types of social networks that are designed to serve the needs of researchers and are definitely not Facebook for scientists. Lightning talks are 5 minutes long, 20 slides, 15 seconds a slide, no breaks, no questions, no second chances.

Learning Objectives: TBD

Moderator:

Phill Jones, Digital Science

8.3 – Recognition for Reviewers

Speakers:

  • Josh Dahl, Head of Publishing & Associations, Thomson Reuters
  • Jody Plank, Rubriq Product Manager: Presubmission Peer Review, Research Square

Along with authors and editors, reviewers are the lifeblood of our organizations. They are in the trenches, providing voluntary feedback to our authors with a mission to help constructively improve science. While reviewers have long viewed their work as important service advance their fields, new methods for providing publicly recognized credit for their service or for more targeted reviewer selection are emerging. Join this session to learn about the new entrants and think differently about your support of your reviewer pool.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understanding new ways to recognize reviewers.
  2. Learning about tools to make finding reviewers easier.
  3. Ways to thank reviewers for their service.

Moderator:

Charles Trowbridge, American Chemical Society

8.4 – Understanding Impact: The Journal Impact Factor and Beyond

Speakers:

  • Betsy Donohue, Vice President, Publisher Business Development, Digital Science
  • Adam Etkin, Managing Director, STRIATUS | PRE
  • Joelle Mascuilli, Head of Content Strategy, Thomson Reuters

As scientsts, editors, academic departments, librarians and others seek to expand their understanding of research impact, this timely session provides a birds eye view of various concepts, metrics and methods being used or developed with the goal of assisting in evaluating impact (short-, long-term, broad) of scholarly publications, most notably journal articles. Audience members will hear from leaders of Thomson Reuters Web of Science, Digital Science/Altmetric, and Striatus, all of which approach the measurement of impact using unique ideas, calculations, and assessments. Youll gain insight as to whats coming next, and youll leave armed with information so that you can assist your organization and its constituents in not only understanding the latest methods to evaluate article impact, but also the concepts involved in augmenting the most common measure of impact, the Journal Impact Factor.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To gain an understanding of new ways to evaluate impact at the article or individual publication-level beyond the traditional JIF.
  2. To learn about the technological developments in evaluating impact from three of the most innovative organizations creating change in this market.
  3. To formulate an understanding of the ideas, formulas, methods, and processes involved in creating metrics and ways to evaluate article impact.
  4. To realize the importance of our role in educating our constituents, including members, readers, authors, and editors, about the benefits of expanding their toolboxes in ascertaining article impact and reach.

Moderator:

Tracey Depellegrin, Genetics Society of America