CSE 2016 Annual Meeting

Monday, 16 May, 2016

Keynote Address: The Poisoner’s Guide to Communicating Science

Deborah Blum

Communicating science to the average citizen – especially those who feel alienated by the research establishment – can seem daunting but is essential in a time when decisions need to be made about issues ranging from climate change to managing the spread of the Zika virus to dangerous lead exposures in countless communities. In this talk, Pulitzer-prize winning science journalist Deborah Blum – author of The Poisoner’s Handbook and director of the Knight Science Journalism Program at MIT – will explore some of the essential tools that journalists today use in connecting with the public on science issues.

Deborah Blum is a highly acclaimed science journalist and former president of the National Association of Science Writers. Ms. Blum is also co-editor of A Field Guide for Science Writers. Her work has been translated into more than a dozen languages, optioned for film, and has appeared in numerous publications, including The New York Times, Slate, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, The Guardian, Discover, and Health. She also is the Director of the Knight Science Journalism Program at MIT and is currently working on a new online magazine called Undark, launching this spring.

1.1 Starting a New Journal: Nuts, Bolts & Open Access

Speakers:

  • Katherine Bennett, Managing Editor, American Society for Radiation Oncology
  • Angela Cochran, Director, Journals, American Society of Civil Engineers
  • Cara Kaufman, Managing Partner, Kaufman Wills Fusting & Company

Launching a new journal can be a daunting task. Many factors contribute and must be considered when the first discussions begin on the potential for a new journal. This session will highlight the planning and path on making the decision to begin a new journal, followed by the nuts and bolts from potential titles, choosing an editor, editorial workflow issues, marketing, timelines, and more. And finally, launching an open access journal will be highlighted.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand what to consider when making a decision to launch a new journal.
  2. Understand logistics when launching a new journal.
  3. Know how to launch an open access journal.

Moderator:

Sheehan Misko, Associate Director & Senior Managing Editor, American Association for Clinical Chemistry

1.2 – Transition from Print to Online Publishing

Speakers:

  • Helen Atkins, Director, Publishing Services, Public Library of Science (PLoS)
  • David Gillikin, Chief, Bibliographic Services Division, National Library of Medicine
  • Trish Groves, MBBS, MRCPsych, Deputy Editor, The BMJ, Editor-in-Chief, BMJ Open

The session’s topic is the digital transition from publishing a journal focused mainly on print to publishing online first/only online. That includes letting the online publication be the archived and indexed version and letting go of page number as part of the article ID etc. The session will also focus on the possibility to publish content and create citations (in PubMed etc.) continuously instead of publishing and indexing whole issues at a time.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Transition from print to online publishing.
  2. Indexing and creating citations based on online content.
  3. Continuous publication.

Moderator:

Merete Holtermann, Managing Editor, The Journal of The Norwegian Medical Association

1.3 – Editorial and Publishing Questions – Data Informed Solutions

Speakers:

  • Esmeralda Buchanan, Senior Director, Journals and Books Publishing, American Cancer Society
  • Brittany Campbell, Marketing Manager, National Academy of Sciences
  • Jill Jackson, Manuscript Processing & Publishing Administrator, American College of Physicians
  • Kerry Kroffe, Senior Editorial Manager, PLOS ONE
  • Jeanette Panning, Assistant Director, Publications Programs, American Geophysical Union
  • Sarah Tegen, PhD, Vice President, Global Editorial & Author Services, American Chemical Society

The session will consist of lightning talks delivered by presenters describing their work-related, practical questions and how they used data to draw informed answers. Topics include the following:

  • Are my users my customers?
  • Should we increase our frequency of publication and page budget?
  • How do I determine the most effective reminder strategy to ensure the most efficient peer review times?
  • Who in the world is accessing our publications? And how do we target them?
  • How can I use data to understand the editorial and production strengths and weaknesses of my journal compared to competing journals?
  • How can we reach our audience on social media?

Come prepared to appreciate that many things can be counted but some things are not easily measured.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn from a variety of case studies how individuals have used data to address editorial and publishing questions.
  2. Understand what data is available and how it may be used for the session topics.

Moderator:

Jill Jackson, Manuscript Processing & Publishing Administrator, American College of Physicians

1.4 – Scientific Misconduct: Investigating Alleged Misconduct and Educating to Prevent it

Speakers:

  • Jennifer Nyborg, Professor, Colorado State University
  • Kathryn Partin, Director, Office of Research Integrity
  • Joseph Rosse, Associate Vice Chancellor of Research Integrity & Compliance, University of Colorado at Boulder
  • Heather Tierney, PhD, Managing Editor, Journals and Ethics Policy, American Chemical Society

In the publishing community, allegations of ethical misconduct can be investigated by the journal or escalated to a university compliance office or other advisory boards such as the Office of Research Integrity in the US (or another respective body abroad) for adjudication. All of these different investigative bodies can have differing goals when they investigate alleged misconduct, and these goals can dictate different practices. These same groups also educate constituents to prevent ethical misconduct.

The speakers in this session will discuss the goals and practices of ethical misconduct investigations in their organization. They will also discuss programs to prevent ethical misconduct.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand why different investigative bodies have different goals and practices when examining alleged misconduct.
  2. Learn about programs to educate and prevent ethical misconduct.

Moderators:

Anne Coghill, Manager, Peer Review Operations, American Chemical Society

2.1 – Making a Large Impact with a Small Budget

Speakers:

  • Judy Connors, Associate Director, Editorial Services Managing Editor, TIRS/GF, The Drug Information Association (DIA)
  • James MacGregor, Publishing Services Coordinator, Public Knowledge Project
  • Charlie Rapple, Sales & Marketing Director, Co-Founder, Kudos

This session will provide participants with several proven solutions to make a large impact on their journals with a small budget. Although the session is primarily geared toward small journals, all journal publishers face resource and budget constraints and can benefit from tips to maximize their resources. Topic areas will include marketing techniques with a small staff; networking and social media; and an option for a low-cost peer-review tracking system. Upon completion of the session, participants will be able to utilize speakers experiences to implement large impact strategies at their own journals for no to little additional cost.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will learn how to utilize a small staff and additional relationships to generate ideas and successfully implement big impact changes.
  2. Participants will learn how Kudos can help them broaden readership and increase the impact of their research.
  3. Participants will gain an understanding of Open Journal Systems (OJS), developed by the Public Knowledge Project and how their journal/s can utilize this freely available, open source software.

Moderator:

Mary Beth Schaeffer

2.2 – Knowledge Exchange: Roundtable Discussions

Speakers:

  • Mary L. Chang, ELS, Publications Manager, American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
  • Liz Krznarich, Software Engineer/UI Design, ORCID
  • Jennifer Lin, Director of Product Management, CrossRef
  • Sarah McCormack, Assistant Director of Editorial and Production Operations, American Society for Nutrition
  • David Mellor, PhD, Project Manager, Center for Open Science
  • Kristen Overstreet, Senior Partner, Origin Editorial
  • May Piotrowski, Editorial Director, American Academy of Ophthalmology
  • Gillian Shasby, Director of Publications-Operations, JNS Publishing Group
  • Elaine Williams, Director, Editorial Systems and Administration, The JAMA Network

The best questions, and their answers, are often encountered during informal discussions with others who have happened upon the same situations and concerns. This session will provide you with the opportunity to choose from nine topics over two 25 minute rounds of discussion. Bring a question, an answer, or just your curiosity

2016 Topics:

  • CME Credit
  • Strategic Planning for a Journal
  • Interactive Quality Checklist in the Editorial Office
  • What happens when you reduce peer review durations?
  • Rebranding
  • When Policy Changes Mean Important Changes to the Instructions for Authors
  • ORCID Reviewer Credit & Publisher ORCID Mandates
  • Registering Content with Crossref Before Online Availability
  • Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) Guidelines

Learning Objectives:

  1. Engage in an open discussion with other Editors on a variety of topics.
  2. Ask questions, or provide answers, relating to your experience(s) with the topic.

Moderator:

Anna Jester, Director of Sales & Marketing, eJournalPress

2.3 – Dynamic Publishing – Living Documents in the Indexed Literature

Speaker:

  • David Gillikin, Chief, Bibliographic Services Division, National Library of Medicine
  • Charlotte Kent, PhD, Executive Editor, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • Allyson Mower, MA, MLIS, Associate Librarian and Head, Scholarly Communication & Copyright, University of Utah, J. Willard Marriott Library

To meet the evolving needs of readers and to keep abreast of technological advances, the indexed literature must integrate the flexibility and functionality inherent to a living (or dynamic) document posted on the Internet. This session will be conducted in a new format, similar to an interactive Town Hall. The panelists will frame the issues and the audience will be invited to think creatively and collectively to outline a solution. Put on your thinking cap and be part of this first CSE “publication puzzler.”

Medical and scientific societies publish practice guidelines in the indexed literature. These guidelines are static and often become outdated shortly after publication. The indexed literature is an authoritative and credible source, in part, due to a journals credibility and value-added from editorial or peer review. In addition, it provides enhanced discoverability (e.g., MEDLINE) and meets the ingrained expectations of users. Despite these benefits, it has limitations because, to be effective, guidelines must be updated in real-time to reflect the current best-practices. Therefore, authors must select increasingly between the index literature and web-based platforms, but neither offer a comprehensive solution. The Internet can accommodate iterative content, but it doesnt archive the successive changes in a rigorous or standard method and lacks the value-added of scholarly publishing. Will the future herald a new publication format; where journal article meets wiki?

Learning Objectives:

  1. To describe the need, benefit and role of living documents in scholarly publishing.
  2. To characterize the limits of indexed literature regarding dynamic publishing.
  3. To solicit creative solutions regarding how the flexibility and functionality inherent to a living (or dynamic) document can be integrated into the indexed literature.

Moderator:

Christine Casey, MD, Editor, MMWR Serials, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

2.4 – Data Sharing – Benefits for Researchers, Editors and Publishers

Speakers:

  • Meghan Byrne, PhD, Senior Editor, PLOS ONE
  • Abraham Haileamlak, MD, Professor, Jimma University

There is a growing consensus that data generated in clinical trials and in all areas of science need to be shared. The rationale behind requiring data sharing and the practical aspects of sharing have been the subject of much discussion and many lessons have been learned as requirements are proposed and/or imposed.

In 2016, the ICMJE published a set of proposed requirements for the sharing of de-identified individual patient data from the clinical trials published in its member journals. Requiring sharing of clinical trial data has raised questions of “how?” and “with whom?”
Publishers of fundamental research across a wide range of biology and medicine that require data availability for acceptance to publication must answer these questions, as well as “why” and “when”. How they are doing so has yielded important findings.
This session will focus on the rationale and practices for data sharing across science — what journals need to do, what are the challenges for researchers, editors, and publishers, and what are the benefits that result.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Know the ICMJE definitions of clinical trial.
  2. Describe the ICMJE proposed Mechanisms of acquiring deidentified patient data.
  3. What are the justifications for data sharing requirements.
  4. Understand the responsibility of funders, authors and researchers, institutions, editors, and publishers.
  5. Discuss the challenges for the researchers who are to share their data and the editors who publish them.
  6. Learn how a data sharing requirement was implemented at a specific journal or publisher and tips for those who have yet to do this.

Moderator:

Mary Beth Schaeffer, Managing Editor, Annals of Internal Medicine

3.1 – The EQUATOR Network: Medical Reporting Guidelines & the Editors’ Core Competency Guidelines

Speakers:

  • James Galipeau, PhD, Knowledge Synthesis Group, Clinical Epidemiology Program
  • David Riley, MD, Associate Editor, The Permanente Journal; Executive Editor, AIHM Journal Club; Helfgott Research Institute, Adjunct Faculty; Board Member, Academy of Integrative Health and Medicine

The EQUATOR Network curates reporting guidelines for studies published in health and medical journals and also publishes other resources for study authors. This session will describe EQUATORs work to improve the value of medical research by promoting transparent and accurate reporting of studies and also outline the steps of guideline development. The session includes a presentation about a guideline under development to determine core competencies for editors of medical/scientific journals. The development of this guideline was initiated to provide material for formal training for biomedical editors so that they can perform more effectively in their roles.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn what the EQUATOR Network offers to authors and editors.
  2. Learn how reporting guidelines are developed.
  3. Learn about the development of a new guideline for core competencies for medical/scientific editors .

Moderator:

Patricia Baskin, MS, Executive Editor, Neurology Journals, American Academy of Neurology

3.2 – Making Headlines – Examining the News Media Supply Chain

Speakers:

  • Jennifer Laloup, Editorial Media Manager, PLOS
  • Preeti Malani, MD, MSJ, Associate Editor, JAMA; Director of Media Relations, JAMA Network; Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases, The University of Michigan
  • Alexandra Witze, Correspondent, Nature

This session will discuss ways science editors can work collaboratively with mainstream media organizations by exploring the “news media supply chain” – the process of identifying research articles worthy of a press release; of working with in-house staff and/or science writers to write effective press releases; of coordinating with university/funder/institutional press offices to promote their organizations’ output; on working with Eurekalert! and similar embargoing service platforms that make your content available to journalists; on embargo process and policies that provides fairness to journalists wishing to write about your research; and on tools for tracking media coverage as part of Article Level Metrics.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Attendees will learn about the process for creating press releases for scientific articles.
  2. Attendees will learn about ways to distribute those press releases so they are used by journalists.
  3. Attendees will learn helpful tips from journalists and science writers that will make their press releases more likely to be used.
  4. Attendees will hear some suggestions on how to track media coverage.

Moderator:

Mark Johnson, Director, Contributor Experience & Product Marketing, PLOS

3.3 – Think. Check. Submit. – The Impact of Predatory Journal and How to Identify Them

Speakers:

  • Charlie Rapple, Sales & Marketing Director, Co-Founder, Kudos
  • Donald Samulack, PhD, U.S. Operations, Editage/Cactus Communications
  • Nick Shockey, Director of Programs & Engagement, SPARC, Director, Right to Research Coalition

With the number of journals growing at roughly 3.5% annually, and the professional pressure to publish greater than ever before, the lure of predatory journals is increasingly problematic. In this session, our speakers will discuss how best to identify predatory publishers, the impact they are having in the STM publishing industry, and effective ways to avoid them when submitting your own work. Toward the end attendees will learn about the “Think. Check. Submit.” campaign.

Learning Objectives:

  1. What is a predatory journal?
  2. What is the prevalence and impact of predatory journals in STM publishing?
  3. What are the best ways to identify and avoid submitting to predatory journals?

Moderator:

Ken Heideman, Director of Publications, American Meteorological Society

3.4 – Just How Retracted Is It?

Speakers:

  • Jennifer Lin, CrossRef
  • Joelle Masciulli, Head of Research Discovery, Thomson Reuters
  • Joe Rosse, PhD, Associate Vice Chancellor of Research Integrity & Compliance, University of Colorado at Boulder

This session will review what happens after a journal retracts a paper. Studies have shown that retracted papers continue to be cited as if they have never been retracted. Speakers will cover topics such as what happens in abstract databases when a paper is retracted, how best to alert readers that a paper has been retracted, and how to prevent retracted papers from being cited in new papers.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Review best practices for correcting the literature, particularly with regard to retractions.
  2. A behind the scenes peak at what happens down the road with indexing services when you retract a paper.
  3. Tips for how best to ensure that readers everywhere, accessing content from different places, know that a paper has been retracted.

Moderator:

Kelly Anderson, Managing Editor, American Society of Civil Engineers

4.1 – Data Files and the Editorial Office – We Know What It Is, Now What Do We Do With It

Speakers:

  • Anita Bandrowski, Specialist, Center For Research in Biological System, University of California, San Diego
  • Tamara Hanna, PhD,Acquisitions Editor, American Chemical Society
  • Meredith Morovati, Executive Director, Dryad

“Big data” has been a buzzword in scholarly publishing for the past several years as all stakeholders grapple with what that phrase means to academic publishing. Each field has varying needs for data file types relevant to its community, requiring different platforms and tools to facilitate collaboration, analyzation, and publication. Only in recent years has the tidal wave of big data made its way to the shores of editorial offices, forcing journal staff to seek to understand what it means for day-to-day journal operations. This session is designed to provide some answers, from the policies and philosophies set by funders and publishers, to a journal case study involving the integration of large data files into the peer review process, to a nonprofit providing the technological framework for including large data files in peer review and publication systems.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn about the cultural shift in academic publishing that is embracing data and resource publication/sharing and its implications for reproducibility in science.
  2. Lessons learned from a journal that added data review to their peer review process. System creation, submission platform integration, and author/reviewer experience will be discussed.
  3. Hear from one data repository vendor on trends theyre seeing in the demand for data storage and sharing among journals and publishers.

Moderator:

Brittany White, Editorial Services Coordinator, J&J Editorial

4.2 – Mind the Gap: Gender Disparities in Leadership Positions in Scholarly Publishing

Speakers:

  • Angela Cochran, Director, Journals, American Society of Civil Engineers
  • Ken Heideman, Director of Publications, American Meteorological Society
  • Lauren Kane, COO, BioOne
  • Louise Page, Publisher, PLOS
  • Charlie Rapple, Sales & Marketing Director, Co-Founder, Kudos

While scholarly publishing as a profession attracts more women than men, recent demographic surveys illustrate a sizeable gender gap among the industry’s senior leadership. While many acknowledge the problems posed by this disparity, there is less agreement surrounding what can be done to correct it. In an effort to continue discussions on this important topic, this session is a continuation of a session of the same title presented at the 2015 SSP Annual Meeting. Panelists will focus on concrete ways that the industry and its members can support a more diverse leadership, including a discussion of the importance of speaking opportunities for professional advancement.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understanding of scholarly publishing demographics.
  2. Discussion of concrete ways to promote gender equity among top leadership positions.
  3. Collection of ideas on how CSE and its peer organizations can support a strong, diverse industry.

Moderator:

Lauren Kane, COO, BioOne

4.3 – What Constitutes Good Practice in Sponsor Review of Publications Arising from Sponsored Research

Speakers:

  • Art Gertel, Principal, MedSciComm
  • Trish Groves, MBBS, MRCPsych, Head of Research, BMJ; Editor-in-Chief, BMJ Open
  • Renu Juneja, MedImmune
  • Mina Patel, Senior Director, Scientific Communications, Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
  • Tatjana Poplazarova, PhD, Vice President, Vaccines Office of Medical Governance & Bioethics, GSK

Many research sponsors review manuscripts before submission. Such reviews may be helpful for fact checking or protecting intellectual property but there is little guidance as to what constitutes helpful review. This session will hear from sponsors to understand current practices for providing publication review and editors to hear their viewpoint. The session will then discuss what sponsors and editors would consider good practice.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand some of the regulations/guidelines that sponsors have to adhere to.
  2. Understand current practices for manuscript review by sponsors (e.g. pharmaceutical companies).
  3. Learn how journals can encourage greater transparency of the review processes.

Moderator:

Dr. Elizabeth Wager, Publications Consultant, Sideview

4.4 – Public Access Policy Mandates & How Publishers Are Responding

Speakers:

  • David Crotty, PhD, Editorial Director, Journals Policy, Oxford University Press
  • Michael Levine-Clark, Interim Dean and Director, University of Denver Libraries
  • Neil Thakur, PhD, Special Assistant to the Deputy Director for Extramural Research and Program Manager of NIH Public Access Policy, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Office of Extramural Research

Research funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is required to be publicly accessible upon publication. In this session we look at the mandate and how publishers and libraries are responding. We will discuss the role of CHORUS, researcher access, and PubMed Central. For historical context, we will look at the tense relationship between The National Library of Medicine (NLM) and publishers, and thoughts on how they can work as partners rather than competitors.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn about Public Access Mandates, and how they affect your publication.
  2. Understand the role of CHORUS and funding as it relates to the National Library of Medicine (NLM).
  3. Discuss the relationship between the NLM and publishers from a historical perspective.
  4. Provide directions for the NLM/PubMedCentral and publishers to work together in harmony.

Moderator:

Michael Casp, Production Services Coordinator, J&J Editorial

Tuesday, 17 May, 2016

Plenary Address: The Leading Edge of Publishing

3 panelists will join us to talk about their varied perspectives around editing, peer review, assessment, and technology. A lively Q&A session from these thought leaders will set the tone for the last day of the Annual Meeting.

Speakers:

  • Annette Flanagin, RN, MA, FAAN, Executive Managing Editor, Vice President Editorial Operations, JAMA and The JAMA Network
  • Alex Humphreys, Director, JSTOR Labs, JSTOR
  • Cassidy R. Sugimoto, PhD, Associate Professor, School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University Bloomington

Moderator:

Sarah Tegen, PhD, Vice President, Global Editorial & Author Services, American Chemical Society

5.1 – Managing Editor-in-Chief Transitions

Speakers:

  • Feng Chen, PhD, Assistant Director, Editorial Development and China Strategic Partnerships, American Chemical Society
  • Judy Connors, Associate Director, Editorial Services Managing Editor, TIRS/GF, The Drug Information Association (DIA)
  • Katherine Egan Benett, Managing Editor, American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)
  • Alice Ellingham, Director, Editorial Office Ltd.
  • Heather Goodell, Director, Scientific Publishing, American Heart Association

An editor-in-chief transition is a big deal. Whether this is something that happens every two years or ten, managing this process can be daunting, and no one knows better than those in the editorial office how important it is to get it right. In this session, five expert panelists will discuss the details of transitioning editors-in-chief, from the search process to the business-related logistics and the impact on editorial and workflow.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Explore strategies for managing an editor-in-chief transition.
  2. Consider the importance of engaging the incoming and outgoing editors-in-chief in the process and how this can be accomplished.
  3. Discuss recommendations for successful transitions.
  4. Identify realistic positives and negatives (potential benefits and pitfalls) of editor-in-chief transitions.

Moderator:

Mary K. Billingsley, ELS, Managing Editor, American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

5.2 – Ethics Clinic: Authorship Issues – When Author’s Problems Become Your Problems

Speakers:

  • Jennifer Mahar, Executive Peer Review Manager, Origin Editorial

In a perfect world authors would all agree and submit to a journal with a fully functioning package of information for their manuscript submission but thats not what happens. As we ask questions of authors issues arise, whether it be deliberate or completely innocent we often get embroiled in difficult situations which everyone from the editorial assistant, to the Managing Editor the Associate Editors the Editor in Chief the production editor, the society president and the publisher have to address. We will present a few cases to show you what can happen as these issues arise that apply to all audience members and what steps can be taken to work through and resolve the case. Audience participation is required!

Learning Objectives:

  1. Enable session participants to feel more confident when dealing with authors changes during peer review and beyond.
  2. Provide potential workflows and tools for participants to take back.
  3. Listen and participate in cases that could affect your own workflows.
  4. Become exposed to all aspects of the slippery slope of authorship issues to help learn what not to do when such issues arise.

Moderator:

Jennifer Mahar, Executive Peer Review Manager, Origin Editorial

5.3 Emerging Standards: Data and Data Exchange in Scholarly Publishing

Speakers:

  • Jeffrey Beck, Technical Information Specialist, NCBI, National Library of Medicine
  • Jay Henry, Chief Marketing Officer, Ringgold, Inc.
  • Jennifer Lin, PhD, Director of Product Management, CrossRef
  • Heather Pierce, JD, MPH, Senior Director for Science Policy and Regulatory Counsel, Association of American Medical Colleges

There are several organizations, such as the AAMC, CrossRef, ORCID, CASRAI, NIH and Ringgold, that are putting forth ideas to standardize data and data exchange throughout scholarly publishing. This session will discuss new initiatives that address such challenges as standardizing conflict of interest reporting, easily identifying funding sources, clarifying contributor roles for research papers, and managing institution disambiguation.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn about the Convey system to standardize financial interest disclosures and facilitate conflict of interest reviews.
  2. Understand the purpose of the Open Funder Registry and how it can be utilized.
  3. Learn about CrossRefs efforts surrounding Clinical Trials information.
  4. Understand how JATS compliance can increase the ability for organizations to easily and effectively communicate with each other.
    Learn about developments in and the importance of expanded interoperability of scholarly information pertaining to authors, researchers, and others involved in the creation and dissemination of content. Further, we will discuss the increased availability of standard identifiers such as the Ringgold Identifier for institutions, and their effect on a more connected ecosystem.

Moderator:

Tony Alves, Director of Product Management, Aries Systems

5.4 – Telecommuting: The Joys and Perils

Speaker:

  • Melissa Blickem, Senior Peer Review Analyst, American Chemical Society
  • Nancy Devaux, Process Improvement Manager, Sheridan Journal Services
  • Nan Hallock, BS, MFA, Director of Publishing, The Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening
  • Robin Switzer, ELS, MSPH, Sole Proprietor, ESL Medical Editing, LLC

This session is for anyone who works as a telecommuter or who manages telecommuters. We aim to share our varied experiences in telecommuting, to present suggestions for how to optimize the work and relationships of telecommuters, and to discuss problems and challenges that arise in the process of working remotely. Several speakers will be presenting their experiences as managers of telecommuters, while others will be presenting the perspective of those who work as telecommuters. We will reserve ample time for questions, answers, and discussion.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand what telecommuting is and decide if it suits you.
  2. Learn about the perspectives of people with different kinds of involvement in telecommuting.
  3. Learn how to manage telecommuters.
  4. Learn how to work successfully as a telecommuter.

Moderator:

Robin Switzer, Sole Proprietor, ESL Medical Editing, LLC

6.1 – Editing Medical and Scientific Tables (Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Grid)

Speakers:

  • Peter J. Olson, ELS, Senior Copyediting Coordinator, Sheridan Journal Services

Medical and scientific tables are densely packed repositories of data that must be edited with a steady hand in order to preserve the accuracy and integrity of the information while presenting it in a comprehensible and succinct fashiona task that has struck fear in the hearts of many a manuscript editor. In this session, participants will be introduced to the basic tenets of editing medical and scientific tables, including best practices for table structuring, formatting, and organization. In addition, several technical tips will be offered for efficient and expedient table editing in Microsoft Word.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn best practices for table structuring, formatting, and organization.
  2. Learn Microsoft Word tips for editing tables.

Moderator:

Peter J. Olson, ELS, Senior Copyediting Coordinator, Sheridan Journal Services

6.2 – Preprints: Evolving Research Dissemination

Speakers:

  • David Crotty, PhD, Editorial Director, Journals Policy, Oxford University Press
  • Tracey DePellegrin, Executive Editor, Genetics Society of America
  • Louise Page, Publisher, PLOS

Disseminating research is no longer limited to traditional forms of journal publishing. This session seeks to discuss the quickly-evolving role of preprints in biomedical literature and the upsurge is usage of preprint technology. Presenters will review the history of preprint servers, including arXiv and bioRxiv, and look at todays technological and intellectual offerings. We will explore the role of preprints in establishing precedent for research; whether a preprint constitutes publication; how preprints can augment journals and other ways of scholarly communication; the pitfalls of preprints; discussions taking place re: preprints and credit for authorship, research, reviews, access requirements; role of federal funders in preprints. The audience will have a chance to review case studies and to participate in a point-counterpoint style session around preprints and their role in the scientific publishing ecosystem.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the potential benefits and shortfalls of allowing preprints (as a publisher).
  2. Gain a more thorough understanding of how researchers are afforded credit for their ideas.
  3. Learn more about available technological platforms for hosting preprints, as well as how the technology fits into various publishing workflows.
  4. Better grasp views of different scientific communities wrt preprints.

Moderator:

Tracey DePellegrin, Executive Editor, Genetics Society of America

6.3 – Implementing Standards: Data and Data Exchange in Scholarly Publishing

Speaker:

  • Michael Di Natale, Business Systems Analyst, Aries Systems
  • Gabriel Harp, Senior Product Manager, Cell Press
  • Susan King, Executive Director, Rockefeller University Press; Chair CHOR Inc.

There are several organizations putting forth ideas to standardize data and data exchange throughout scholarly publishing. This session will discuss the implementation of standards initiatives including CHORUS, JATS, CRediT and more. This session extends far past “why” toward “how.”

Learning Objectives:

  1. Learn about Cell Press pilot implementation of an emerging standardized taxonomy for contributors, AKA CRediT.
  2. Learn about one publishers adoption and implementation of CHORUS.
  3. Understand how JATS compliance can increase the ability for organizations to easily and effectively communicate with each other.
  4. Learn about developments in and the importance of expanded interoperability of scholarly information pertaining to authors, researchers, and others involved in the creation and dissemination of content. Examples include leveraging standards in manuscript transfers and ingest from other platforms.

Moderator:

Tony Alves, Director of Product Management, Aries Systems

6.4 – Building a Better Mousetrap – New Models of Peer Review

Speakers:

  • Andy Collings, Executive Editor, eLife
  • Annette Flanagin, RN, MA, FAAN, Exeutive Managing Editor, Vice President, Editorial Operations, JAMA and The JAMA Network
  • Trish Groves, MBBS, MRCPsych, Head of Research, BMJ; Editor-in-Chief, BMJ Open

Peer review is a basic concept that can vary wildly from journal to journal. We will be talking about current vs. new models of peer review, the pros and cons, and how to strike the right balance between transparency of the process to build trust, and packaging it in a way that gets used and adds value to the scientific record.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the benefits of single- and double-blind review.
  2. Learn about the open peer review.
  3. Discover new models of post-publication peer review.

Moderator:

Michael Casp, Production Services Coordinator, J&J Editorial

7.1 – The Future Ain’t What it Used to Be: What Changing Business Models and Strategic Planning Mean to Editorial and Production Teams

Speakers:

  • Michael Cannon, Director of Serial Publications and Editorial Services, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)
  • Jeanette Hammann, Director of Publications, The Geological Society of America
  • Gillian Shasby, Director of Publications-Operations, JNS Publishing Group

Production schedules, strategic plans, and business models continually morph as publishing content for current and future consumers evolves. Join us to learn how moving to a fully gold open access model or creating a strategic journal plan affects editorial and production teams at our speakers organizations.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Attendees will learn about strategic planning for journals and moving to open access in a phased approach. Specific emphasis will be placed on how this changes editorial and production work.

Moderator:

Anna Jester, Director of Sales & Marketing, eJournalPress

7.2 – Implementing ORCID in Publishing Systems: Progress Report

Speakers:

  • Helen Atkins, Director, Publishing Services, PLOS
  • Andy Collings, Executive Editor, eLife
  • Liz Krznarich, Software Engineer/UI Design, ORCID

In January 2016 a number of publishers posted an Open Letter on the ORCiD website wherein they pledged to begin requiring authors to provide an ORCiD for all published papers. Publishers signing on will determine their own schedule for implementing this change, but all will follow a set of best practices. The list of publishers continues to grow and can be seen along with the documentation of best practices at this location. This session will cover both the expectations from ORCiD, and the experiences of some of the publishers who are implementing the requirement this year.

Learning Objectives:

  1. How publishers are using ORCID in their workflows.
  2. What are the best ways to implement ORCID in my own workflow.
  3. What the requirements are for ORCID implementation.

Moderator:

Helen Atkins, Director, Publishing Services, PLOS

7.3 – Insights and Strategies for Career Development

Speakers:

  • Lauren Fischer, Manuscript Editing Manager, The JAMA Network
  • Tom Lang, MA, Principal, Tom Lang Communications and Training International
  • Rajashree Ranganathan, Manager, Journal Production, American Society of Civil Engineers

How did I get here? How do I get there? There may not be a roadmap for a career in publishing, but there are things you can do to forward your career and help strengthen your candidacy for the job you want. This session will discuss insights and traditional and non-traditional strategies for career development from editorial, production, and freelance perspectives.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Evaluate traditional and non-traditional approaches to career development.
  2. Explore career development from editorial, production, and freelance perspectives
  3. Discuss potential qualifications of a well-rounded candidate.
  4. Consider potential growth opportunities..

Moderator:

Mary K. Billingsley, ELS, Managing Editor, American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

7.4 – Demand a Recount: Investigating and Correcting Indexing Errors

Speakers:

  • Keith T. Gigliello, MS, Senior Manager, Digital Publications, American Society of Hematology
  • Carissa A. Gilman, Managing Editor, Cancer, American Cancer Society

Since so much is riding on your journals Impact Factor, it would serve a publisher to make sure the data calculated by Thomson Reuters is correct. This session will discuss how to audit your Impact Factor calculation as well as outline steps that a publisher can take to correct any miscalculations.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand how the impact factor is calculated.
  2. Learn how you can monitor how your journal is being indexed by Web of Science.
  3. Learn how to address concerns regarding any perceived errors in the Impact Factor calculation.

Moderator:

Carissa A. Gilman, Managing Editor, Cancer, American Cancer Society

8.1 – The Craft and Business of Language Editing and Copyediting

Speaker:

  • Katharine OMoore-Klopf, ELS, Owner, KOK Edit (sole proprietorship)
  • Kurt Spurlock, ELS, Quality Manager, American Journal Experts

Working directly with science authors to edit their manuscripts can be lucrative and fulfilling, and it provides a vital service to authors facing the publish-or-perish mandate. To succeed, authors editors must focus not only on editing but also on participating in or even running a business. However, business skills are not usually taught in editing and publishing courses and degree programs, so many authors editors, particularly those who are self-employed, have knowledge deficits in that area. This session will teach you how and where to find clients, how to market your business, how to develop and maintain excellent authoreditor relationships so that clients keep returning, what sources to use for continuing professional education, and what sources to use for professional networking.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To know how and where to find clients .
  2. To know how to begin marketing your business.
  3. To know how to develop and maintain excellent authoreditor relationships.
  4. To know where to seek continuing professional education.
  5. To be able to find sources for professional networking.

Moderator:

Jennifer Deyton, Senior Partner, J&J Editorial

8.2 – What Journals Can Do To Help Build Research Capabilities in Low and Middle Income Countries

Speakers:

  • Lila Castellanos-Serra, Professor, Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Cuba
  • Trish Groves, MBBS, MRCPsych, Deputy Editor, The BMJ, Editor-in-Chief, BMJ Open

 

Estimates suggest that 85% of research is wasted, because it asks the wrong questions, is inadequately designed, not published, or poorly reported.

In many fields research waste can delay or divert progress and can cause harm. This problem is especially urgent in low and middle income countries facing major challenges to build their academic outputs and reputations, public services, industries, and economies, and the well-being of their populations.

We will look at how journals can identify fixable causes of research waste; provide education, guidance, and editorial policies to help build research capabilities; learn to love study questions more than answers; and help to improve the scientific and ethical integrity of research.

We will use case studies:

  • Scientific writing course and personal mentorship programme (Cuba, February 2016) run by MEDICC Review, PAHO, Cuba’s National School of Public Health and its Medical Sciences Information Center – resulting in 26 manuscripts.
  • BMJ’s Research to Publication elearning programme for early career researchers

Learning Objectives:

  1. To understand why editors should appraise research on the basis of its questions and methods, not its results (to avoid selective reporting, p-hacking, and publication bias).
  2. To understand how journals can use evidence-based reporting guidelines to ensure transparent reporting of research.
  3. To appreciate the importance of statistical and methodological review of submitted research.
  4. To consider how journals and publishers can provide educational content, outreach, and other resources to help build research skills and capabilities – particularly for researchers in LMICs.

Moderator:

Trish Groves, Head of Research, BMJ; Editor-in-Chief, BMJ Open

8.3 – Enhancing Peer Reviewer Selection, and Meeting Reviewers’ Needs for Development, Feedback and Recognition

Speakers:

  • Tamara Hanna, PhD, Acquisitions Editor, American Chemical Society
  • Mary Warner, Assistant Director of Publications, American Geophysical Union

Peer Review is a process scientific scholarly journals use to ensure content published represent the best scholarship available.

The session will address a range of areas related to journal peer reviewers. Topics covered include best practices for peer reviewer selection and retention, effective approaches for updating peer reviewer databases. The session will also offer suggestions for addressing the challenge of peer reviewer overload, due to journals competing for a finite number of potential peer reviewers with relevant knowledge, and ways to notify and send reminders to reviewers to ensure a smooth and timely review process (or at least a timely decline of the request for review).

The session will also address how to evaluate peer reviewers and offer them feedback on their performance, as well as how to weed out reviewers with a possible bias and those offering toxic or unhelpful reviews. Finally, the session will discuss how to recognize and reward peer reviewers for their effort and contribution.

Learning Objectives:

  1. List best practices for peer reviewer selection, orientation, and retention, and effective approaches for updating peer reviewer databases.
  2. Describe procedures for communicating with reviewers around assignments, procedures for reminding tardy reviewers, and suggestions for how to promote acceptance of assignments by peer reviewers bombarded with invitations.
  3. Articulate established and novel approaches for evaluating peer reviewers, and offer them feedback on their work, and processes for identifying and tagging reviewers that due to bias or other problems should not be invited to accept future manuscript assignments.
  4. Discuss the benefits of formal recognition of peer reviewers, including offering educational credits, public recognition, or recognition letter sent to their institution to counteract the perception that peer is less valued than other scholarly contributions.

Moderator:

Ingrid Philibert, PhD, MBA, Sr. Vice President, Field Activities and Executive Managing Editor, Journal of Graduate Medical Education, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)

8.4 – Taking it to the Next Level: Lightning Talks from Innovators Solving Real Business Problems

Speakers:

  • Deepika Bajaj, Head of Marketing and Growth, RedLink
  • Laura Farrelly, Chief Operating Officer, Couragion
  • Sherisse Hawkins, CEO & Cofounder, Beneath the Ink
  • Paul Johnston, PhD, Founder, Pubref
  • Martijn Roelandse, Manager Publisher Innovation, Springer Nature
  • Donald Samualck, PhD, President, U.S. Operations, Editage/Cactus Communications
  • Aaron Sorensen, BS, MA, Senior Bibliometric Consultant, Digital Science
  • Martin Szormszor, Head of Data Science, Digital Science
  • Kristi Ward, Global Director, Library Marketing, Sage

Lightning talks are ubiquitous in publishing conferences today. Springing out of the computer technology sector in towards the end of the 90s, theyre a fast, high energy way for people with new ideas to give their elevator pitch to a room full of interested professionals, like you. There is a temptation for these talks to simply assemble a rag-tag group of start-ups that are innovating for its own sake, or to call on people who are already known in the industry. This session will be different, Ive assembled a mix of local start-ups, existing companies with new ideas born of real market needs, and some surprisingly relevant players from outside the industry. Hopefully, youll agree that these presenters are solving real problems.

Learning Objectives:

  1. To learn more about the state of innovation ins scholarly communication.
  2. To showcase local entrepreneurial talent from the Denver area.
  3. To get some new ideas about how to innovate in your own organizations in a market relevant way.

Moderator:

Phill Jones, PhD, Head of Publisher Outreach, Digital Science